Does Moz hate his female fans?

CrystalGeezer

My secret's my enzyme.
whichishotter.jpg
 

CrystalGeezer

My secret's my enzyme.
^^^ I think this is more to Moz's liking.

07diary600.1.jpg

These boys don't look like hummus and our Mozzy has a prediliction for flicking the garbanzo bean. HEEEYYYYYY-YOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!

tadum CHA!

I'll be here all week, folks. Drive safe and don't forget to tip your waitress.
 

Oh my god. it's Robby!

spontaneously luminescent
OK, i'm gonna pretend that our Moz is a mainly heterosexual man ;)
if so, I understand his problems with women :straightface:
its simple, you speak the same "language" as us men, but the words mean different things
worse yet, things like actions, tone, volume, etc, etc
mean different things to you
he has chosen to "hate" this, I don't agree, but having a real problem with it
yes, I understand, all smart men know this
yet it seems so many women cling to a male conspiracy in belief :tears:
which I know is not true!
 

alainsane

Charter Member (since 1998)
I struggle with your struggle...but your struggle is not mine.

I wrote my post title thinking of the various ways that I (as a white male from the U.S.) struggle with the struggles faced by groups to which I do not belong: women, visible minorities, invisible minorities, the mentally ill, the destitute, etc., etc.

Some (Jimmy Kimmel with his vegan Duck Dynasty lampoon for example) say it is a "yuppy" (pre-)occupation to be concerned with the struggles of the "other"--as if the struggles of the groups to which I *do* belong are nonexistent or not enough to fill my time. This isn't true for me. I cogitate a lot on my own struggles--the argument that white males have no struggles to speak of is one such struggle!--but I also live in a world where I regularly experience the "other," and (not being entirely closed-off) I'm nudged to struggle with their struggles. I yearn for equality of the races, but anything I say about the struggle of blacks is going to be inherently assailable because 1. I am not black and 2. I am not a black woman. I want for LBGT eqality, but it is my position as a heterosexual that leaves open to attack my opinions about what makes the "right" kind of gay romance (go dig up my long-ago review of Brokeback Mountain). Unless I just stop caring about humankind, I will always struggle with those other struggles--even though/when those struggle are not mine.

I think P.D. Heaton struggled with others' struggles when he wrote songs like, "36D" and "Woman In The Wall": songs that bore such a fingerprint of foreign struggle as to leave open to question whether they were legitimate. Briana Corrigan left The Beautiful South because of her own doubts about Heaton's intentions. I think a person reading the lyrics of those and other Beautiful South songs can--if they are charitable enough--spot the intended irony in "Mirror"; that they can understand Heaton's honorable (if ill-advised) intentions for "36D." IMO, railing against those being exploited by the sex-trade industry (which is damn near everything industrial) is like blaming the poor for poverty. The thing is...I can at least suss out Heaton's probable intentions in writing those songs--no matter how far off the target that "misguided man" has gotten.

With Morrissey, however, I sense none of this struggle with others' struggles insofar as those others are people--just animals. I used to think that Morrissey was just disinterested in women, but more and more, I began to wonder if he didn't actually have a general disdain for women--though he does seem to have some friendships with women like Linder and Nancy Sinatra and Courtney Love and so on. Part of it is that women play so few obvious parts in his songs that when one is positively identified as female, I pay all the more attention to them in that context.

"Pretty Girls Make Graves" is way up on the alert list but so are these things that have made me wince or wonder:

His use of the term "fatty" in the "You're The One For Me, Fatty" video made me cringe right at the moment I first saw the scene where the woman eats the flower as if she's uncontrollably famished. Before that part of the video, I thought he was just being ironic.

"and everything she wants costs money..." from "Girl Afraid" depicts a woman only concerned with material objects.

"Sweetness, sweetness, I was only joking when I said I'd like to smash every tooth in your head etc." I know "sweetness" is never gender-linked, but the word tends to be used with women. This one also has us conjure up visions of Jean d'Arc being burned at the stake!

Cemetry Gates' "Some dizzy whore, eighteen hundred and four." Just another unflattering word usually applied to women.

"Loud, loutish lover, treat her kindly; though she needs you more than she loves you." is this the woman who later shows up in his Alma Matter video (see below)?

"Girlfriend in a coma"???

"Writing frightening verse to a buck-toothed girl in Luxembourg" I always found that particular turn-of-phrase kind of mean-spirited--even when I was in high school.

The woman from the "Dagenham Dave" video is portrayed as a shrill harpie, who looks cheap and shallow.

"Margaret on the Guillotine." Granted...Thatcher did much to arouse the ire of many in England at the time, but that he jumps to beheading her... *shrugs*

"Her very lowness with a head in a sling; I'm truly sorry, but it sounds like a wonderful thing" ditto above.

Morrissey throws a bowl of cereal over his shoulder into the face of a woman in "Alma Matters" (what the bleep did that video have to do with that song anyway?). This was the closest thing I could envision to Morrissey tacitly approving of domestic violence (or not disapproving of it). It *is* battery, if nothing else; though, there's nothing to say Morrissey is portraying himself in his Beck t-shirt. Still, he's very rarely "played" someone else in his videos.

I never approved of Morrissey's use of the word "dykes" in "All The Lazy Dykes." I likened it to a white person saying the N-word. That word aside (though lazy isn't much better besides), I was troubled by the "story" of that song. It was like he was outing lesbians as being judgmental women who only want to "turn" heterosexual women. *shrugs*

The bigger woman from "Interesting Drug" is not horribly depicted, but when she finally "jumps on the bandwagon" for Morrissey's animal rights cause (the one the handsome young lads were already in support of), she's dressed up in a Playboy® bunny outfit!

His wearing of Playboy® logo shirts on tour seems an ill-advised move, likely (if nothing else) to subconsciously perpetuate the institutionalized sexual objectification of women.

Morrissey's quote about Madonna (emphasis mine): "Madonna reinforces everything absurd and offensive. Desperate womanhood. Madonna is closer to organized prostitution than anything else." Whether or not he meant to equate the two, the collocation of his two sentences make his message read, "Desperate womanhood is everything that is absurd and offensive."

There are plenty of other examples I could cite here, but I haven't the time...or inclination. As with Heaton, I've tried in earnest to give Morrissey the benefit of the doubt--to see how he is struggling with the struggles that are not his own when he characterizes women. Mostly, I haven't seen that. :(
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
1 "Pretty Girls Make Graves" is way up on the alert list but so are these things that have made me wince or wonder.
1.I think he is more the subject than the pretty girl, though this is definitely his most obvious song that you could cite.

2 His use of the term "fatty" in the "You're The One For Me, Fatty" video made me cringe right at the moment I first saw the scene where the woman eats the flower as if she's uncontrollably famished. Before that part of the video, I thought he was just being ironic.
2. Okay.

3."and everything she wants costs money..." from "Girl Afraid" depicts a woman only concerned with material objects.
3.Not unless Frankly Mr Shankley is anti-male. You can't have a rule where adding a negative characteristic to a female character applies to all females. Also, these are meant to be the thoughts of a young man who feels unsure or inadequate, so, like Pretty Girls Make Graves, he's talking about where he feels he falls short.

4."Sweetness, sweetness, I was only joking when I said I'd like to smash every tooth in your head etc." I know "sweetness" is never gender-linked, but the word tends to be used with women. This one also has us conjure up visions of Jean d'Arc being burned at the stake!
4. How is it" never gender-linked?" He is singing to the Queen. But saying something nasty about the Queen doesn't apply to all women. It is violent but I think in this case it's well over the top and meant to be shocking but not outrageous, in that I didn't expect anyone would ever take it seriously.

5.Cemetry Gates' "Some dizzy whore, eighteen hundred and four." Just another unflattering word usually applied to women.

5.oh my, you're just trying to up the score now. Again, whore is used like a punchline. Also whore may "usually" be used to mean woman but honestly when I hear about "A poet who was a dizzy whore" I picture a gay man. But then that's MY personal issues being brought in. In other words, no. Adding things like this to make your list longer is a mistake. Have three undeniable things on your list. If you can't find three undeniable things, give up.

6. "Loud, loutish lover, treat her kindly; though she needs you more than she loves you." is this the woman who later shows up in his Alma Matter video (see below)?
6.Don't know. What are you saying here? *checks clock*

7. "Girlfriend in a coma"???

7. ???

8. "Writing frightening verse to a buck-toothed girl in Luxembourg" I always found that particular turn-of-phrase kind of mean-spirited--even when I was in high school.
8.I always thought it was funny and made the song seem like it was about actual physical human beings. Have you advanced in other areas since high school? I'm guessing yes, so there is hope.

9. The woman from the "Dagenham Dave" video is portrayed as a shrill harpie, who looks cheap and shallow.
9. You prove above that you don't know what irony means, so here's an example. Writing a bullshit list in support of feminism (or something, I admit I'm not clear what your point is...) *ahem* writing a bullshit list in support of women in which you criticize a woman for... looking shallow! If this was Scrabble you would get triple word points. You ARE shallow, and you say a woman *looks* shallow!!!!! You should have stopped before you got this far.

10. "Margaret on the Guillotine." Granted...Thatcher did much to arouse the ire of many in England at the time, but that he jumps to beheading her... *shrugs*
*shrugs back* and...?
10. "Her very lowness with a head in a sling; I'm truly sorry, but it sounds like a wonderful thing" ditto above.
*still shrugging*

11. Morrissey throws a bowl of cereal over his shoulder into the face of a woman in "Alma Matters" (what the bleep did that video have to do with that song anyway?). This was the closest thing I could envision to Morrissey tacitly approving of domestic violence (or not disapproving of it). It *is* battery, if nothing else; though, there's nothing to say Morrissey is portraying himself in his Beck t-shirt. Still, he's very rarely "played" someone else in his videos.
11. Okay, this one I was going to grant you, until you mentioned he might be playing a character... Hmmm... wonder if he might be playing a character in some of these other examples? No, I shouldn't do that because I think you're actin in good faith.

12. I never approved of Morrissey's use of the word "dykes" in "All The Lazy Dykes." I likened it to a white person saying the N-word. That word aside (though lazy isn't much better besides), I was troubled by the "story" of that song. It was like he was outing lesbians as being judgmental women who only want to "turn" heterosexual women. *shrugs*

12.*shrugs* When you shrug I don't want to do the work to tell you why you're wrong, but I will. "Outing lesbians as ju7dgmental women"... really? The woman in the song that is being urged to go and join the girls is not heterosexual. Once she does her life begins at last. Here's another example of irony for you, though. Morrissey is telling this woman that she would be happier if she accepted her sexuality! I know, right?

13. The bigger woman from "Interesting Drug" is not horribly depicted, but when she finally "jumps on the bandwagon" for Morrissey's animal rights cause (the one the handsome young lads were already in support of), she's dressed up in a Playboy® bunny outfit!
13. *shrugs?* (not sure if I should shrug there or not.) Maybe it has some meaning other than the one you seem to have received but failed to specify?

14.His wearing of Playboy® logo shirts on tour seems an ill-advised move, likely (if nothing else) to subconsciously perpetuate the institutionalized sexual objectification of women.
lol you need some updated bullshit terminology. This feels really 90's. Not sure how wearing that shirt would... do that. Help?

15.Morrissey's quote about Madonna (emphasis mine): "Madonna reinforces everything absurd and offensive. Desperate womanhood. Madonna is closer to organized prostitution than anything else." Whether or not he meant to equate the two, the collocation of his two sentences make his message read, "Desperate womanhood is everything that is absurd and offensive."
15. You really only need the middle bit. Someone ought to ask him about desperate womanhood. I think he must have said this before he realized that pop music is prostitution.

16. There are plenty of other examples I could cite here, but I haven't the time...or inclination. As with Heaton, I've tried in earnest to give Morrissey the benefit of the doubt--to see how he is struggling with the struggles that are not his own when he characterizes women. Mostly, I haven't seen that.
16. Most of what you did cite is easily dismissed. You're lucky to have realized you don't have time to add more. Still... you expect people to read and consider this and then you tell them you aren't really that interested? Fair enough. You might have realized before you started posting these examples.
 

realitybites

making lemonade
Subscriber
Re: I struggle with your struggle...but your struggle is not mine.

I wrote my post title thinking of the various ways that I (as a white male from the U.S.) struggle with the struggles faced by groups to which I do not belong: women, visible minorities, invisible minorities, the mentally ill, the destitute, etc., etc.

Some (Jimmy Kimmel with his vegan Duck Dynasty lampoon for example) say it is a "yuppy" (pre-)occupation to be concerned with the struggles of the "other"--as if the struggles of the groups to which I *do* belong are nonexistent or not enough to fill my time. This isn't true for me. I cogitate a lot on my own struggles--the argument that white males have no struggles to speak of is one such struggle!--but I also live in a world where I regularly experience the "other," and (not being entirely closed-off) I'm nudged to struggle with their struggles. I yearn for equality of the races, but anything I say about the struggle of blacks is going to be inherently assailable because 1. I am not black and 2. I am not a black woman. I want for LBGT eqality, but it is my position as a heterosexual that leaves open to attack my opinions about what makes the "right" kind of gay romance (go dig up my long-ago review of Brokeback Mountain). Unless I just stop caring about humankind, I will always struggle with those other struggles--even though/when those struggle are not mine.

I think P.D. Heaton struggled with others' struggles when he wrote songs like, "36D" and "Woman In The Wall": songs that bore such a fingerprint of foreign struggle as to leave open to question whether they were legitimate. Briana Corrigan left The Beautiful South because of her own doubts about Heaton's intentions. I think a person reading the lyrics of those and other Beautiful South songs can--if they are charitable enough--spot the intended irony in "Mirror"; that they can understand Heaton's honorable (if ill-advised) intentions for "36D." IMO, railing against those being exploited by the sex-trade industry (which is damn near everything industrial) is like blaming the poor for poverty. The thing is...I can at least suss out Heaton's probable intentions in writing those songs--no matter how far off the target that "misguided man" has gotten.

With Morrissey, however, I sense none of this struggle with others' struggles insofar as those others are people--just animals. I used to think that Morrissey was just disinterested in women, but more and more, I began to wonder if he didn't actually have a general disdain for women--though he does seem to have some friendships with women like Linder and Nancy Sinatra and Courtney Love and so on. Part of it is that women play so few obvious parts in his songs that when one is positively identified as female, I pay all the more attention to them in that context.

"Pretty Girls Make Graves" is way up on the alert list but so are these things that have made me wince or wonder:

His use of the term "fatty" in the "You're The One For Me, Fatty" video made me cringe right at the moment I first saw the scene where the woman eats the flower as if she's uncontrollably famished. Before that part of the video, I thought he was just being ironic.

"and everything she wants costs money..." from "Girl Afraid" depicts a woman only concerned with material objects.

"Sweetness, sweetness, I was only joking when I said I'd like to smash every tooth in your head etc." I know "sweetness" is never gender-linked, but the word tends to be used with women. This one also has us conjure up visions of Jean d'Arc being burned at the stake!

Cemetry Gates' "Some dizzy whore, eighteen hundred and four." Just another unflattering word usually applied to women.

"Loud, loutish lover, treat her kindly; though she needs you more than she loves you." is this the woman who later shows up in his Alma Matter video (see below)?

"Girlfriend in a coma"???

"Writing frightening verse to a buck-toothed girl in Luxembourg" I always found that particular turn-of-phrase kind of mean-spirited--even when I was in high school.

The woman from the "Dagenham Dave" video is portrayed as a shrill harpie, who looks cheap and shallow.

"Margaret on the Guillotine." Granted...Thatcher did much to arouse the ire of many in England at the time, but that he jumps to beheading her... *shrugs*

"Her very lowness with a head in a sling; I'm truly sorry, but it sounds like a wonderful thing" ditto above.

Morrissey throws a bowl of cereal over his shoulder into the face of a woman in "Alma Matters" (what the bleep did that video have to do with that song anyway?). This was the closest thing I could envision to Morrissey tacitly approving of domestic violence (or not disapproving of it). It *is* battery, if nothing else; though, there's nothing to say Morrissey is portraying himself in his Beck t-shirt. Still, he's very rarely "played" someone else in his videos.

I never approved of Morrissey's use of the word "dykes" in "All The Lazy Dykes." I likened it to a white person saying the N-word. That word aside (though lazy isn't much better besides), I was troubled by the "story" of that song. It was like he was outing lesbians as being judgmental women who only want to "turn" heterosexual women. *shrugs*

The bigger woman from "Interesting Drug" is not horribly depicted, but when she finally "jumps on the bandwagon" for Morrissey's animal rights cause (the one the handsome young lads were already in support of), she's dressed up in a Playboy® bunny outfit!

His wearing of Playboy® logo shirts on tour seems an ill-advised move, likely (if nothing else) to subconsciously perpetuate the institutionalized sexual objectification of women.

Morrissey's quote about Madonna (emphasis mine): "Madonna reinforces everything absurd and offensive. Desperate womanhood. Madonna is closer to organized prostitution than anything else." Whether or not he meant to equate the two, the collocation of his two sentences make his message read, "Desperate womanhood is everything that is absurd and offensive."

There are plenty of other examples I could cite here, but I haven't the time...or inclination. As with Heaton, I've tried in earnest to give Morrissey the benefit of the doubt--to see how he is struggling with the struggles that are not his own when he characterizes women. Mostly, I haven't seen that. :(

Excellent post. Very thought-provoking. :thumb: Morrissey may have indulged in feminist theory during his formative years, but I don't think he is a feminist, by any stretch of the imagination. Morrissey does not relate to 'other'--unless 'other' is a non-human animal.

"His wearing of Playboy® logo shirts on tour seems an ill-advised move, likely (if nothing else) to subconsciously perpetuate the institutionalized sexual objectification of women."

Couldn't agree more.
 

realitybites

making lemonade
Subscriber
1 "Pretty Girls Make Graves" is way up on the alert list but so are these things that have made me wince or wonder.
1.I think he is more the subject than the pretty girl, though this is definitely his most obvious song that you could cite.

2 His use of the term "fatty" in the "You're The One For Me, Fatty" video made me cringe right at the moment I first saw the scene where the woman eats the flower as if she's uncontrollably famished. Before that part of the video, I thought he was just being ironic.
2. Okay.

3."and everything she wants costs money..." from "Girl Afraid" depicts a woman only concerned with material objects.
3.Not unless Frankly Mr Shankley is anti-male. You can't have a rule where adding a negative characteristic to a female character applies to all females. Also, these are meant to be the thoughts of a young man who feels unsure or inadequate, so, like Pretty Girls Make Graves, he's talking about where he feels he falls short.

4."Sweetness, sweetness, I was only joking when I said I'd like to smash every tooth in your head etc." I know "sweetness" is never gender-linked, but the word tends to be used with women. This one also has us conjure up visions of Jean d'Arc being burned at the stake!
4. How is it" never gender-linked?" He is singing to the Queen. But saying something nasty about the Queen doesn't apply to all women. It is violent but I think in this case it's well over the top and meant to be shocking but not outrageous, in that I didn't expect anyone would ever take it seriously.

5.Cemetry Gates' "Some dizzy whore, eighteen hundred and four." Just another unflattering word usually applied to women.

5.oh my, you're just trying to up the score now. Again, whore is used like a punchline. Also whore may "usually" be used to mean woman but honestly when I hear about "A poet who was a dizzy whore" I picture a gay man. But then that's MY personal issues being brought in. In other words, no. Adding things like this to make your list longer is a mistake. Have three undeniable things on your list. If you can't find three undeniable things, give up.

6. "Loud, loutish lover, treat her kindly; though she needs you more than she loves you." is this the woman who later shows up in his Alma Matter video (see below)?
6.Don't know. What are you saying here? *checks clock*

7. "Girlfriend in a coma"???

7. ???

8. "Writing frightening verse to a buck-toothed girl in Luxembourg" I always found that particular turn-of-phrase kind of mean-spirited--even when I was in high school.
8.I always thought it was funny and made the song seem like it was about actual physical human beings. Have you advanced in other areas since high school? I'm guessing yes, so there is hope.

9. The woman from the "Dagenham Dave" video is portrayed as a shrill harpie, who looks cheap and shallow.
9. You prove above that you don't know what irony means, so here's an example. Writing a bullshit list in support of feminism (or something, I admit I'm not clear what your point is...) *ahem* writing a bullshit list in support of women in which you criticize a woman for... looking shallow! If this was Scrabble you would get triple word points. You ARE shallow, and you say a woman *looks* shallow!!!!! You should have stopped before you got this far.

10. "Margaret on the Guillotine." Granted...Thatcher did much to arouse the ire of many in England at the time, but that he jumps to beheading her... *shrugs*
*shrugs back* and...?
10. "Her very lowness with a head in a sling; I'm truly sorry, but it sounds like a wonderful thing" ditto above.
*still shrugging*

11. Morrissey throws a bowl of cereal over his shoulder into the face of a woman in "Alma Matters" (what the bleep did that video have to do with that song anyway?). This was the closest thing I could envision to Morrissey tacitly approving of domestic violence (or not disapproving of it). It *is* battery, if nothing else; though, there's nothing to say Morrissey is portraying himself in his Beck t-shirt. Still, he's very rarely "played" someone else in his videos.
11. Okay, this one I was going to grant you, until you mentioned he might be playing a character... Hmmm... wonder if he might be playing a character in some of these other examples? No, I shouldn't do that because I think you're actin in good faith.

12. I never approved of Morrissey's use of the word "dykes" in "All The Lazy Dykes." I likened it to a white person saying the N-word. That word aside (though lazy isn't much better besides), I was troubled by the "story" of that song. It was like he was outing lesbians as being judgmental women who only want to "turn" heterosexual women. *shrugs*

12.*shrugs* When you shrug I don't want to do the work to tell you why you're wrong, but I will. "Outing lesbians as ju7dgmental women"... really? The woman in the song that is being urged to go and join the girls is not heterosexual. Once she does her life begins at last. Here's another example of irony for you, though. Morrissey is telling this woman that she would be happier if she accepted her sexuality! I know, right?

13. The bigger woman from "Interesting Drug" is not horribly depicted, but when she finally "jumps on the bandwagon" for Morrissey's animal rights cause (the one the handsome young lads were already in support of), she's dressed up in a Playboy® bunny outfit!
13. *shrugs?* (not sure if I should shrug there or not.) Maybe it has some meaning other than the one you seem to have received but failed to specify?

14.His wearing of Playboy® logo shirts on tour seems an ill-advised move, likely (if nothing else) to subconsciously perpetuate the institutionalized sexual objectification of women.
lol you need some updated bullshit terminology. This feels really 90's. Not sure how wearing that shirt would... do that. Help?

15.Morrissey's quote about Madonna (emphasis mine): "Madonna reinforces everything absurd and offensive. Desperate womanhood. Madonna is closer to organized prostitution than anything else." Whether or not he meant to equate the two, the collocation of his two sentences make his message read, "Desperate womanhood is everything that is absurd and offensive."
15. You really only need the middle bit. Someone ought to ask him about desperate womanhood. I think he must have said this before he realized that pop music is prostitution.

16. There are plenty of other examples I could cite here, but I haven't the time...or inclination. As with Heaton, I've tried in earnest to give Morrissey the benefit of the doubt--to see how he is struggling with the struggles that are not his own when he characterizes women. Mostly, I haven't seen that.
16. Most of what you did cite is easily dismissed. You're lucky to have realized you don't have time to add more. Still... you expect people to read and consider this and then you tell them you aren't really that interested? Fair enough. You might have realized before you started posting these examples.

Your counterarguments are weak. Sorry.
 

alainsane

Charter Member (since 1998)
I shared my reactions to an inexhaustive list of various aspects of Morrissey's output that have given me pause over the years. It's enlightening to see other people's takes on those same things.
 

CrystalGeezer

My secret's my enzyme.
I don't think he hates women. In these lyrics, in the autobiography...

You know when you're talking to someone telling a story and you dip into a character completely unlike yourself to make a comedic point? Like you'll start to talk ghetto randomly then slip back to normal you? I think he does that when writing, like he scats bitchy but the motivation gets lost in print. I think sweet Moz, and you all know him, is regular Morrissey who loves women and men and animals and his mother and is naive about how some stuff works but has huge ideas, and feisty Moz is just something he dabbles with, it's like his devil taking the floor for a few lines here and there, but he's not driving the Morrissey car in general.
 

LazyDyke

New Member
Well, there's the brutal misogyny of this comment, which will never leave my mind:

View attachment 16542

There's a way to say, "I wasn't interested in girls" without using such hateful descriptions. These are not the words of a man who has attraction towards or respect for females. Truly disappointed.

THIS!

Thank you.

I don't see how any female fan can read this and not be disgusted. Way to go, Moz. Way to go.
 

CrystalGeezer

My secret's my enzyme.
Shut up and deal.
 

BrummieBoy

BrummieBoy
I don't think he hates women. In these lyrics, in the autobiography...

You know when you're talking to someone telling a story and you dip into a character completely unlike yourself to make a comedic point? Like you'll start to talk ghetto randomly then slip back to normal you? I think he does that when writing, like he scats bitchy but the motivation gets lost in print. I think sweet Moz, and you all know him, is regular Morrissey who loves women and men and animals and his mother and is naive about how some stuff works but has huge ideas, and feisty Moz is just something he dabbles with, it's like his devil taking the floor for a few lines here and there, but he's not driving the Morrissey car in general.


You're an obese woman. He doesn't like obese women and makes jokes about 'fat women' in song. and in his bitchy autobiography. What part of Stockholm Syndrome don't you understand? You need to lose weight before the next tour in case he sees you and be offended.
 

CrystalGeezer

My secret's my enzyme.
You're an obese woman. He doesn't like obese women and makes jokes about 'fat women' in song. and in his bitchy autobiography. What part of Stockholm Syndrome don't you understand? You need to lose weight before the next tour in case he sees you and be offended.

Nah. I buy the cheap seats and am too busy to queue, there's no chance of him seeing me. :cool: Also I fully understand the lyrics to Scandinavia.
 

BrummieBoy

BrummieBoy
Nah. I buy the cheap seats and am too busy to queue, there's no chance of him seeing me. :cool: Also I fully understand the lyrics to Scandinavia.

Cheap seats? Do you have to buy two? On airlines? And in concert halls? No chance of him seeing you? Only if he forgets his contact lenses or you wear an invisibility cloak, dear.
 

Playcat2000

New Member
Cheap seats? Do you have to buy two? On airlines? And in concert halls? No chance of him seeing you? Only if he forgets his contact lenses or you wear an invisibility cloak, dear.

I’m sure you’re no f***ing prize, Brummie so shut the f*** up. idiot.
 

CrystalGeezer

My secret's my enzyme.
Cheap seats? Do you have to buy two? On airlines? And in concert halls? No chance of him seeing you? Only if he forgets his contact lenses or you wear an invisibility cloak, dear.

11845493284_df928ce3c4_z.jpg


OMG good idea, just become so huge he can't miss me. I gotta prep for the tour and switch these pretzel sticks out for cheetos. I gotta go to the store asap. Brummie you're a goddam genius.
 
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