Is Morrissey too political?

Are modern Morrissey lyrics too political?


  • Total voters
    22
U

URBANUS

Guest
Many people criticise Morrissey's political views for being "all over the place", but I actually think that he's been pretty consistent throughout his career. You have to bear in mind that Morrissey comes from that generation of the British working class who were shunned by Thatcher after the collapse of socialism (their natural ideological allegiance up to that point) and then betrayed by Blair when he pushed the political "left" to the centre. Many working-class British people from that generation were left to feel that nothing on the political spectrum represented them until years later, when "man of the people" Nigel Farage came along with his populist message and EU scapegoating. If you look at Morrissey from that perspective, his politics have been consistent, from being staunchly anti-Conservative in the '80s, to politically apathetic in the '90s, to his more recent flirtations with populists like Farage and Galloway, both of whom represent opposite ideological extremes. That's why it's so difficult to pin today's Morrissey down as either "left wing" or "right wing".

That said, to answer the question of whether or not I think he's "too political"... Although I find some of his outbursts during interviews and on stage ignorant and disappointing, I'm generally enjoying witnessing his political development in the lyrics themselves, even if I don't agree with everything he stands for. That said though, I find his lyrics to be far more sophisticated than his outbursts. I can't object to anything he said in 'Spent the Day in Bed', for example, and I'm glad he's saying it.

Prince Daniel of Sweden seems to agree:

 

countthree

Well-Known Member
What about it? Did you read the original post or just the thread title?

Of course I read it. It seems you didn't do it. The question is: Are modern Morrissey lyrics too political? That's why I said what I said about TQID, super political lyrics.
 
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Quando quando quando

Well-Known Member
I mean it's not as if he wasn't political before. I just think he was at times more subtle with it or at least more poetic with it. If he did Theresa May on the guillotine now I think you'd all be bitching about it. I just think the whole rebellious anti authority starts to look at lot less cool when you get middle aged.

Yeah, that guillotine was very subtle indeed. :rolleyes:
 

Calamine Lotion

Well-Known Member
You do sum it up well but I think most on here realise all of that. Moz never went into any complicated political debate or discussed the depths of it. He just put a finger up to feel where the wind was blowing and then he went against public opinion.

Maybe Moz is anarchist at heart and want to see a real revolution where they really kick politicians heads about instead of footballs (Aztec's outrage over the term football will cause an earthquake soon).
We wonder if the thunder
Is ever really gonna begin
Begin, begin

The way he repeats "begin" there, "begin, oh, begin, oh, begin" sounds like he is calling on "the thunder."
"there's a country, you don't live there" because it exists only as an ideal or a memory, "but one day you would like to, and if you show them what you're made of, oh, you might do."
How ironic is he really being with those lyrics?
I think that the reason he doesn't allow himself to be pinned down on a lot of his views is because, first of all he's trolling a lot of the time and if he were to explain what he means the inconsistencies would become clear. Also because a lot of his views would not be popular with the sort of people that are more likely to buy his records. He would be better off to make his remarks about other pop stars and leave politics out of it. I think he's too lazy to inform himself and he can afford the luxury of being inconsistent. He wants some vanished England, lost when the "floodgates" of immigration were opened, but he also hates the monarchy. What ideal past does he actually have in mind?
 
U

URBANUS

Guest
We wonder if the thunder
Is ever really gonna begin
Begin, begin

The way he repeats "begin" there, "begin, oh, begin, oh, begin" sounds like he is calling on "the thunder."
"there's a country, you don't live there" because it exists only as an ideal or a memory, "but one day you would like to, and if you show them what you're made of, oh, you might do."
How ironic is he really being with those lyrics?
I think that the reason he doesn't allow himself to be pinned down on a lot of his views is because, first of all he's trolling a lot of the time and if he were to explain what he means the inconsistencies would become clear. Also because a lot of his views would not be popular with the sort of people that are more likely to buy his records. He would be better off to make his remarks about other pop stars and leave politics out of it. I think he's too lazy to inform himself and he can afford the luxury of being inconsistent. He wants some vanished England, lost when the "floodgates" of immigration were opened, but he also hates the monarchy. What ideal past does he actually have in mind?

The victorian era, maybe he wants a time when men dressed more feminine?

You just reminded me that in the old age when I was young popstars only had a go at other popstars. Most of those feuds were made up so that both could win from it.

Reminds me we had easier problems to deal with back then....
 

the_kaz

Active Member
You do sum it up well but I think most on here realise all of that. Moz never went into any complicated political debate or discussed the depths of it. He just put a finger up to feel where the wind was blowing and then he went against public opinion.
Indeed. The only thing I find out of place in Morrissey's political outlook is that he's critical of Trump, when everything we described suggests he should be a natural supporter. It goes to show, as you say, that he doesn't really have a particularly deep understanding of what he's ranting about.
 

!Viva Hate!

Well-Known Member
Of course I read it. It seems you didn't do it. The question is: Are modern Morrissey lyrics too political? That's why I said what I said about TQID, super political lyrics.

I wrote it, jackass. I know what the f*** it said.

I don't recall asking for any examples of Morrissey's "super political lyrics" pre-2004 or otherwise.

I asked a question pertaining to his post-Quarry output. You failed to meet even the most basic requirements of having a relevant statement in this topic.
 

countthree

Well-Known Member
I wrote it, jackass. I know what the f*** it said.

I don't recall asking for any examples of Morrissey's "super political lyrics" pre-2004 or otherwise.

I asked a question pertaining to his post-Quarry output. You failed to meet even the most basic requirements of having a relevant statement in this topic.

A moderator should take care of your disruptive conduct in this peaceful and well mannered forum.
 

g23

Always crashing in the same car
You do sum it up well but I think most on here realise all of that. Moz never went into any complicated political debate or discussed the depths of it. He just put a finger up to feel where the wind was blowing and then he went against public opinion.

Maybe Moz is anarchist at heart and want to see a real revolution where they really kick politicians heads about instead of footballs (Aztec's outrage over the term football will cause an earthquake soon).
He'd wilt like a daisy and flee the scene if anarchy broke out. He'd be the first away because he's that type.
 

g23

Always crashing in the same car
"Also because a lot of his views would not be popular with the sort of people that are more likely to buy his records. He would be better off to make his remarks about other pop stars and leave politics out of it. I think he's too lazy to inform himself and he can afford the luxury of being inconsistent."

I know he'll say whatever he wants, but he's damaging his stock right now for sure with politics. I get the feeling that this album, despite all the press, will be one where a lot of people stream it out of curiosity over recent controversy, but do not buy it.

One sign that he's on shaky ground, is that if you look on stubhub- (the vultures) you'll see his tickets pretty much at, or below face value at multiple concerts. There were two fifth row seats in Portland available on there for 25 dollars below face, and through the venues own ticketing site, there are still orchestra seats within the first 10 rows available one week from the show. If the scalpers are worried about breaking even, that's something else. Unless there's a miracle between now and next week, I fully expect a rant on Portland, or some sort of issue that prevents them from making it to the venue- somebody's visa didn't clear in time, that sort of thing.
 

Nikita

Senior Member
The problem is not too political or not enough political, but just the quality of most of his recent songs (=lyrics) that deal with politics.

World Peace really sounds as it was written by a teenager.
 

BrummieBoy

BrummieBoy
The problem is it often appears that Morrissey is just trolling political concerns for outrage. He may have deeply held views but he hasn't shared them. It seems like he just throws in contemporary political issues as a 'spice' to liven up his persona/songs. It's also possible he's decided to deliberately trash his public persona as he is no longer able to control it in the internet age. If so, he's not the only artist who has made that decision. I'm just not sure he has the skill to pull it off and I think he's in danger of being dismissed as a reactionary troll rather than an agent provocateur. He may wish to 'slash and burn' his Public Image so severely that all that remains as his 'legacy' is the songs themselves.....I personally find it hard to balance his proclaimed 'sincerity' with regard to his emotional life with what often appears crude trolling of public topics. When he sings about his troubled emotional life he is rivetting. When he trolls politics he just appears clownish.
 

BrummieBoy

BrummieBoy
I know he'll say whatever he wants, but he's damaging his stock right now for sure with politics. I get the feeling that this album, despite all the press, will be one where a lot of people stream it out of curiosity over recent controversy, but do not buy it.

One sign that he's on shaky ground, is that if you look on stubhub- (the vultures) you'll see his tickets pretty much at, or below face value at multiple concerts. There were two fifth row seats in Portland available on there for 25 dollars below face, and through the venues own ticketing site, there are still orchestra seats within the first 10 rows available one week from the show. If the scalpers are worried about breaking even, that's something else. Unless there's a miracle between now and next week, I fully expect a rant on Portland, or some sort of issue that prevents them from making it to the venue- somebody's visa didn't clear in time, that sort of thing.

Even a minor public 'boycott' of his concerts that interrupts his revenue stream would bring about a dramatic change in his public commentary pretty sharpish. Promoters will also be noting such sales data and that will result in them lowering his fee for future performances.
 
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