Johnny Marr, 'Hi Hello' - the worst lyrics and song title in musical history?

A

Anonymous

Guest
A lovely piece of music but sadly ruined by an idiotic song title and what experts agree are among the worst lyrics of all time.
Just check these out:

"When are you coming up
Get away now and go to bed
I'm gonna pick you up
Hear what you say and you're going so fast

And I see you coming down that line
See the future for tomorrow's child
And I watch you when you're losing your mind
And you can't let go

All the places, all the steps
You clamber up the beaten track
When you've fallen and you keep on climbing
You never look back

So hi hello
Whatever you need and wherever you go
I can't say no
One heart beat, any place we run

And I see you coming down that line
See the future for tomorrow's child
And I'll find you when the lights are blinding
And you can't get home

It's never soon enough
And forever's gonna come too fast
Time is calling us
Gets in the way and unfolds the past"

Empty bland meaningless cliche follows empty bland meaningless cliche.
Such a shameful waste of wonderful music.
 
0

001

Guest
A lovely piece of music but sadly ruined by an idiotic song title and what experts agree are among the worst lyrics of all time.
Just check these out:

"When are you coming up
Get away now and go to bed
I'm gonna pick you up
Hear what you say and you're going so fast // this verse has to be about tripping

And I see you coming down that line
See the future for tomorrow's child
And I watch you when you're losing your mind
And you can't let go // done some powder and seems to be addicted to drugs

All the places, all the steps
You clamber up the beaten track
When you've fallen and you keep on climbing
You never look back // seems to be kicking the drugs

So hi hello
Whatever you need and wherever you go
I can't say no
One heart beat, any place we run // Lost me here. Grateful maybe for the help in getting straight??

And I see you coming down that line
See the future for tomorrow's child
And I'll find you when the lights are blinding
And you can't get home // any time you need help, I'll be there??

It's never soon enough
And forever's gonna come too fast
Time is calling us
Gets in the way and unfolds the past" // gibberish

Empty bland meaningless cliche follows empty bland meaningless cliche.
Such a shameful waste of wonderful music.

Added thoughts after each verse.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I wondered if it was about his own children. The lyrics might be vauge and even somewhat empty but they dont embarrass or make me cringe either like some of the boomslang stuff did
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
It's a wonderful song. The lyrics are fine. They make perfect sense.

I think this is just another sour grapes shot at Marr supposedly needing Morrissey. Anything he writes is going to be treated poorly by fans.

To call them the worst lyrics of all time is absurd; especially if you've heard Sorrow Will Come To You In The End.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
J Marr singing but writing these certain words along in the music. J Marr have time to use the song playing. More have play each song with emotion.
 

Dingoatemybabby

Active Member
I wondered if it was about his own children. The lyrics might be vauge and even somewhat empty but they dont embarrass or make me cringe either like some of the boomslang stuff did

In an interview Johnny has said the song was about his daughter. I think a beautiful lyric about unconditional love and how hard it is to let go of your children when they are adults. Being the parent of a teenager, the words brought me to tears when I first heard them.

What a lucky girl she is, having a beautiful song about her that will always remind her of her dad. Reminds me of a story that Sean Lennon told of having a bad day and then hearing John Lennon's "Beautiful Boy" on the radio and how much comfort that brought him.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
In an interview Johnny has said the song was about his daughter. I think a beautiful lyric about unconditional love and how hard it is to let go of your children when they are adults. Being the parent of a teenager, the words brought me to tears when I first heard them.

What a lucky girl she is, having a beautiful song about her that will always remind her of her dad. Reminds me of a story that Sean Lennon told of having a bad day and then hearing John Lennon's "Beautiful Boy" on the radio and how much comfort that brought him.

That’s sweet and makes sense to me as the father of a two and a half year old. Even at this age I’m having trouble letting go as he now wants to run away from me and play. The only thing I’d heard about the lyrics was something about a utopian future or something like that maybe. Wonder if the hi hello part is a reference to your child suddenly seeming like a fully realized person. It’s so easy to always see them as a part of you and your world that it can be surprising to suddenly find them a person with there own world
 

12" on the slack

team baklava
It's no kiss me a lot, kiss me a lot, kiss me all over the fa-a-ace, kiss me a lot, kiss me a lot, kiss me all over the pla-a-ace ...
 

Johnny Barleycorn

Well-Known Member
I think it just proves what we’ve known since 23rd August 1987. Neither man really ever quite reached the pinnacle they achieved when they were together. Morrissey came very close on numerous occasions, but Johnny never got within a mile.

Johnny’s “problem” is/was the same. As good as he is many people can play the guitar proficiently enough to not offended the ears of the average non-musician, but only one person can write a Morrissey lyric.
 

Charlie Cheswick

Well-Known Member
I think it just proves what we’ve known since 23rd August 1987. Neither man really ever quite reached the pinnacle they achieved when they were together. Morrissey came very close on numerous occasions, but Johnny never got within a mile.

Johnny’s “problem” is/was the same. As good as he is many people can play the guitar proficiently enough to not offended the ears of the average non-musician, but only one person can write a Morrissey lyric.

To be fair Johnny is one of only a handful of guitarists where you know it's them when you hear a record. Like if you hear Nile Rogers, Jimmy Page or Brian May you know it's them. Hence why when Johnny plays Smiths stuff it sounds great where as when Moz's boys play it, while not bad it isn't the same.
 

Eustace Walks

Well-Known Member
Yeah I think you're all pretty much bang-on here.

I've just lolloped out of bed to listen to Call the Comet and it's just bland. I forgave The Messenger a little - even Playland because I was going to see it toured live, but this takes the biscuit. 57 minutes is woefully long; the drum machine experiments seem a bit superficial; and he's all but dispensed with 'jangle.'

Don't get me wrong. I'm not one of these people that wants a new Smiths album and as a musician, the way I feel is this: if Johnny's proud of it, good for him. It doesn't float my goat, however, and I'm sad not to be moved by something he does.
 

Orson Swells

Well-Known Member
Yeah I think you're all pretty much bang-on here.

I've just lolloped out of bed to listen to Call the Comet and it's just bland. I forgave The Messenger a little - even Playland because I was going to see it toured live, but this takes the biscuit. 57 minutes is woefully long; the drum machine experiments seem a bit superficial; and he's all but dispensed with 'jangle.'

Don't get me wrong. I'm not one of these people that wants a new Smiths album and as a musician, the way I feel is this: if Johnny's proud of it, good for him. It doesn't float my goat, however, and I'm sad not to be moved by something he does.

I found it a pleasant enough listen - though it sags in the middle and never quite recovers.

The problem with the lyrics is generally solved by leaving the vocal so low in the mix you have no idea what he is saying. Day In Day Out echoes Bigmouth and Girl Afraid while somehow managing not to be very good. New Dominions stuck out as a real clunker and there are occasional embarrassing moments when he's trying to display a bit of "attitude". (I hated the refrain of Bug; one of the songs reminded me of Big Country.)

The production sounded a little mushy and imprecise for my ears at times and at the end it felt a little like having listened to one long song. Still, I've only heard it once and the music is often impressive and enjoyable. It's an undemanding listen certainly and doesn't really move you or say anything; I think I'll probably have it on in the background from time to time.
 
V

vegan.cro spirit# 555

Guest
I found it a pleasant enough listen - though it sags in the middle and never quite recovers.

The problem with the lyrics is generally solved by leaving the vocal so low in the mix you have no idea what he is saying. Day In Day Out echoes Bigmouth and Girl Afraid while somehow managing not to be very good. New Dominions stuck out as a real clunker and there are occasional embarrassing moments when he's trying to display a bit of "attitude". (I hated the refrain of Bug; one of the songs reminded me of Big Country.)

The production sounded a little mushy and imprecise for my ears at times and at the end it felt a little like having listened to one long song. Still, I've only heard it once and the music is often impressive and enjoyable. It's an undemanding listen certainly and doesn't really move you or say anything; I think I'll probably have it on in the background from time to time.
:straightface:

Sounds like a set of outtakes from the last National album:sleeping:
except done in -maybe, not sure- a Welsh dialect.:tiphat:
 

Peppermint

Well-Known Member
I think it just proves what we’ve known since 23rd August 1987. Neither man really ever quite reached the pinnacle they achieved when they were together. Morrissey came very close on numerous occasions, but Johnny never got within a mile.

Johnny’s “problem” is/was the same. As good as he is many people can play the guitar proficiently enough to not offended the ears of the average non-musician, but only one person can write a Morrissey lyric.
I would also suggest, not many can write a (decent) Morrissey vocal melody. For all his present-day arsery, his musical contribution to those songs often gets overlooked. His odd song structure, with little regard for the conventional format, and peculiar melodies which seem somehow biologically attached to the lyrics are unlike anybody else's work. I wonder if that's why Morrissey managed to edge ahead of Marr in their solo careers: he had two unique skills, whereas Marr only had one (great though it was/is).
 
T

Truth

Guest
:straightface:

Sounds like a set of outtakes from the last National album:sleeping:
except done in -maybe, not sure- a Welsh dialect.:tiphat:


Maybe he could join The National next. :guitar:

 
V

vegan.cro spirit# 912

Guest
Maybe he could join The National next. :guitar:




CALL THE COMET:drama:
as predicted has landed with a huge THUD!!:sleeping:

I dont know about Drama J joining the National, that may be against the law. It would be too powerful a SNOOZEFEST.
Peeps driving TO the gig
may fall :sleeping: and make car crashes.:dizzy:
 

Dingoatemybabby

Active Member
That’s sweet and makes sense to me as the father of a two and a half year old. Even at this age I’m having trouble letting go as he now wants to run away from me and play. The only thing I’d heard about the lyrics was something about a utopian future or something like that maybe. Wonder if the hi hello part is a reference to your child suddenly seeming like a fully realized person. It’s so easy to always see them as a part of you and your world that it can be surprising to suddenly find them a person with there own world

I remember those toddler years, they are so precious! This particular song was one of Johnny's personal ones that he said he doesn't usually like to write, but life's too short to let these kinds of feelings remain unexpressed in song. Yes, I do believe the song expresses an admiration for his daughter in finding her own way and the connection and support that will always be there for her. I think it's lovely both musically and lyrically.
 
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