Morrissey Central: "New PETA Ad" (23 September, 2019)

0-1_xwjqcu.jpg


https://www.morrisseycentral.com/messagesfrommorrissey/new-peta-ad

Regards,
FWD.
 

Hovis Lesley

Well-Known Member
All living beings are destined for death and suffering.

If there was a 100% painless way to kill in the abattoir, and the end of cramped or cruel conditions, would that end the argument?
It would end but one contention around the issue of animal welfare. The rest of the arguments would be alive and kicking (unlike the poor creatures). I, personally, dislike the placation and deceit that surrounds the industrialisation of animal existence—so your proposition wouldn’t satisfy me. There is an abattoir in Greater Manchester called ‘Tulip Foods’: it apparently advocates a painless and joyous animal death. And I want the place closed down, forever; I feel everyone ought to.
 

NealCassidy

FREE SPEECH
It would end but one contention around the issue of animal welfare. The rest of the arguments would be alive and kicking (unlike the poor creatures). I, personally, dislike the placation and deceit that surrounds the industrialisation of animal existence—so your proposition wouldn’t satisfy me. There is an abattoir in Greater Manchester called ‘Tulip Foods’: it apparently advocates a painless and joyous animal death. And I want the place closed down, forever; I feel everyone ought to.
Is it better for those animals to never exist in the first place, or die by 'natural causes' (torn apart by larger animal, freeze, infected etc), than to be farmed and die in a painless abbatoir?
 

Hovis Lesley

Well-Known Member
Is it better for those animals to never exist in the first place, or die by 'natural causes' (torn apart by larger animal, freeze, infected etc), than to be farmed and die in a painless abbatoir?
To bring animals which have never existed into the equation is to entertain metaphysical thoughts. Personally, I find the proposition irrelevant. Nevertheless, in some sense I suppose that means yes, it would be better for those animals to never exist. And yes, I’d be happier if animals died by natural causes though I accept my position relates less to the animals and more to how I feel the human race should represent itself.
 

Try Anything Twice

Consultant to the World
Is it better for those animals to never exist in the first place, or die by 'natural causes' (torn apart by larger animal, freeze, infected etc), than to be farmed and die in a painless abbatoir?
I think there is a big difference between animals that are wild and hunted to supply food to a family and those that are bred, raised and slaughtered in an industrialized setting. A very small percentage of food comes from the first while the overwhelming majority from the second. It’s hard to make the case that farmed animals have much quality at life at all.

I mostly do think it would be better for them to have never have existed. They exist for that one purpose alone, to supply food & materials. And then I start to think about people born into overwhelming poverty with a low quality of life. Do I feel the same for them? And I guess I don’t. Because there is always hope that one may find a way to escape from or improve their conditions. I have virtually no hope for farmed animals that they may escape and find happiness and a better quality of life. (And yes, I’ve seen footage of escapees. Those are the exception and regularly caught and right back where they started.)
 

Ketamine Sun

A Most Misunderstood Member
As long as people are not living in the wild like animals then there is no need to eat other animals.

I like to believe that we are advanced enough to choose and create healthier alternatives not only for us but for the planet also.

It’s all very simple.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Is it better for those animals to never exist in the first place, or die by 'natural causes' (torn apart by larger animal, freeze, infected etc), than to be farmed and die in a painless abbatoir?
How do they kill in a painless abbatoir?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
It would end but one contention around the issue of animal welfare. The rest of the arguments would be alive and kicking (unlike the poor creatures). I, personally, dislike the placation and deceit that surrounds the industrialisation of animal existence—so your proposition wouldn’t satisfy me. There is an abattoir in Greater Manchester called ‘Tulip Foods’: it apparently advocates a painless and joyous animal death. And I want the place closed down, forever; I feel everyone ought to.
They should allow cameras in to broadcast these joyous deaths and show it on TV like the documentary morrissey saw. I think a second documentary is well overdue.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I think there is a big difference between animals that are wild and hunted to supply food to a family and those that are bred, raised and slaughtered in an industrialized setting. A very small percentage of food comes from the first while the overwhelming majority from the second. It’s hard to make the case that farmed animals have much quality at life at all.

I mostly do think it would be better for them to have never have existed. They exist for that one purpose alone, to supply food & materials. And then I start to think about people born into overwhelming poverty with a low quality of life. Do I feel the same for them? And I guess I don’t. Because there is always hope that one may find a way to escape from or improve their conditions. I have virtually no hope for farmed animals that they may escape and find happiness and a better quality of life. (And yes, I’ve seen footage of escapees. Those are the exception and regularly caught and right back where they started.)
Your knowledge on the herd is non existant.

But yeah, all the sheep and cows need is a condo and a 75 inch tv and a pack of smokes.

Maybe they can buy a holiday to Benidorm from Thomas Cuckoo.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Joaquin never had to tell white aryan men and women that he's an animal cause it is painfully obvious cause his looks are that of a very sick man with very bad genes.

Human slaughter should at least be something we can discuss with him in mind.
 

Hovis Lesley

Well-Known Member
They should allow cameras in to broadcast these joyous deaths and show it on TV like the documentary morrissey saw. I think a second documentary is well overdue.
These places offer a ‘stunning’ story and headline every second. So one is left to assume that television executives and the press conspire with the meat industry, to maintain the deathly media silence.
 
T

The Irish Hare

Guest
These places offer a ‘stunning’ story and headline every second. So one is left to assume that television executives and the press conspire with the meat industry, to maintain the deathly media silence.
I agree, the industry around the use of animals is everywhere. TV advertising is made up of a lot of food ads containing animals, then you have shoes,clothing, and then dairy. Animal use is tied into everything, even the UK money now has animal body fluids in it.
When you start to read the labels on most food products, there's gelatin, butter, cream,milk,egg,etc.
It's hard to be a purist as a vegetarian never mind vegan. And then for vegans, there's unethical palm oil in some products, which is another issue.
The only way that documentary would be made , would be by gaining access under false pretences or undercover and it would never be shown on TV.
A recent RTE "Prime Time" expose on the greyhound industry in Ireland garnered a lot of attention and has caused a lot of organisations who would have used "a night at the Dogs" as fundraisers to distance themselves.
This is notable as Greyhounds is a big industry here and has got a lot of government support.
Long may the exposes continue.
 

Trending Threads

Top Bottom