Morrissey on Politics, David Bowie, What His Fans Taught Him - interview in Rolling Stone

Ketamine Sun

A Most Misunderstood Member
Spin:

Finally, An Interview Where Morrissey Doesn’t Say Anything Insane.

"Morrissey has managed to do what may have recently seemed impossible and given an interview where he doesn’t sound like an Infowars host. Granted, the interview took place with Rolling Stone writer Rob Sheffield, who has something in common with Morrissey–a deep, uncompromising love of Morrissey. It was also conducted over email, which means that the “Bigmouth Strikes Again” singer may have had the time to actually choose his words more carefully."

https://www.spin.com/2017/12/morrissey-interview-lust-rolling-stone/
:)
Regards,
FWD.

guess Spin was turned down.
 

SuedeMoz

Well-Known Member
THE most telling few lines Moz has uttered in years: "I dream constantly about my old bedroom in Manchester. I am always there, it is always 8:35 and time to walk to school, toppling into ditches of rain. Picture a swan being shot during flight." It took guts to say that. Just shows that he will never escape the past. Perhaps nobody really ever does. That interview was his best this year even if it was just a few questions via e-mail.

Indeed, a brief glimpse back to the past where his interviews were full of slightly sad yet beautiful phrases like this one. Can't help but think of "Back to the Old House" - Hatful version of course.
 

Uncleskinny

It's all good
Subscriber
This sorry site really is dedicated to misery. A fabulous interview such as this - a genuine joy to read, full of quotable gems - and it garners only a handful of comments, with Skinny witheringly grumpiness as usual.
Cheer up and move on in your life if this doesn't bring you any pleasure.

Several points:

1) This sorry site really is dedicated to misery - and yet here you are. Instead of glib generalizations, why not list a litany of your points, and we can discuss them?
2) A fabulous interview such as this - a genuine joy to read, full of quotable gems - in your opinion. Others disagree. I get you don't like that. The interview is a photo-fit e-mail exchange controlled to the hilt, rather than the immediate gob-shooting-off we have on tape from, for example, Der Spiegel. Did you think that was full of 'quotable gems'? A lot of people thought so, and quoted in in the hundreds in many, many news outlets. But I'm guessing you prefer the sanitized controlled version - am i right?
3) and it garners only a handful of comments - because not many people agree with your viewpoint, and now you're angry about that.
4) Skinny witheringly grumpiness as usual - if, by which you mean, Skinny rails against the 'take-everything-at-face-value' and 'unthinking drones glibly parrot the same words' mentality, then you've got me spot on. I'm sorry that comes across as grumpiness to you. I want people to think for themselves, not take everything they're fed.
5) Cheer up and move on in your life if this doesn't bring you any pleasure - well said. I hope it works for you.
 
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A

Anonymous

Guest
I thought that was rather sad. We all pine for moments, feelings, people, and places that are gone forever sometimes. But to do it constantly only distorts and fetishizes the memory until it is warped beyond recognition. Into a perverted and idealized version far from the reality. Even if we could travel back to those moments, they wouldn't be the same because we aren't. For every happy thing discovered, twenty more frustrating/sad/bad ones would appear. Rose colored classes may make dog shit look like chocolate, but they can't change the taste.

It only confirms my belief that Morrissey suffers from a detached personality disorder. I believe that his teenager years were so difficult, and traumatic that he essentially stopped developing emotionally at that time. I think the cruel nature of seventies England, strife at home, and a confused sexuality scarred him emotionally to the point where he couldn't trust people, and develop lasting relationships. I'm sure he was bullied, and that alone can be enough to cause a deep distrust of other people; if not a burning resentment.

Considering the time period, I suspect he didn't experience much nurturing. Fathers weren't raised to nurture their sons, and mothers could be cold; especially in England. His mother sounds fairly doting, but little is known beyond the fact that she let him float. I suspect she saw early signs of his sexuality, and didn't want to pile on. He mentioned that other family members would call her out on being too lenient with him.

On the other hand, it worked out for him. He developed a career where he doesn't have to move on, and one that was probably his only chance at being able to remain independent, and take care of himself. You could even argue that maintaining that adolescent fixation is conducive to sustaining an artist's creativity. The worst thing to happen to aging artists is that they become too practical, and inhibited in their outlook when expressing themselves. Some people see it as growing, but also comes across as boring. If you're not raising children, who cares?

The reality is, post WWII parents created a lot of lingering resentment in their children. I've never heard of a generation before Generation X that seemed to dislike their parents as much as they did. In America, the Vietnam War added to this generational resentment, and the fraying of family bonds. To aspire to your parents life was a form of suicide, or at the very least, a severe form of punishment. Many parents often gave the impression that they didn't even like their children (in the form of "jokes" of course.)

I don't see that same level of resentment in the current generations. Teens seem to have warmer relationships with their parents now. They can converse with them much more freely which creates deeper bonds that last into adulthood.

It's just sad how much social, and political damage the boomer generation has caused. They will go down in history as the most destructive generation. They don't even like themselves.

They created a generation of kids that wanted their parents destroyed, and who could blame them?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Does Spin even exist anymore? That's shocking to me. Same with Rolling Stone. I guess birds have to poop on something.

People who grow older, and stop following the culture like they did when they were young, tend to be shocked that anything can possibly still exist after they've ignored it.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Ah no that's not how it works. Your vote doesn't give you the right to complain. One already has that right. And not voting doesn't remove that right.

It's called free speech, not "Vote and now you have permission to speak."

Maybe so, but ordinary people all over the world die just to try and vote, so I think that is quite an ignorant thing to say. So you can complain all you want but as far as I am concerned, if you don’t bother to vote I also have the right to say “shut the f*** up and stop complaining and just deal with it.”
 

vegan.cro

Banned
Great Q&A interview indeed.
...
Your music has always spoken to the young. Who are the young people who inspire you?
They stare up and at me with every concert. We both know we're in the right place. There's nowhere else to be.
...
Interesting, key persons/engines of M-SoLow didn't see Morrissey (in concert) over - decade.
 

No1uno

Member of the Month™
Subscriber
Great Q&A interview indeed.
...
Your music has always spoken to the young. Who are the young people who inspire you?
They stare up and at me with every concert. We both know we're in the right place. There's nowhere else to be.
...

Just in the snippet you posted, this is very subservient- morrissey is higher and the audience is lower.
 

vegan.cro

Banned
Just in the snippet you posted, this is very subservient- morrissey is higher and the audience is lower.

Didn't understand it that way. Also, for sure, Morrissey don't think that way.
By the way, just in the snippet you posted, this is very subservient - you didn't react to the fact: key persons/engines of M-SoLow didn't see Morrissey (in concert) over - decade.
 

No1uno

Member of the Month™
Subscriber
Didn't understand it that way. Also, for sure, Morrissey don't think that way.
By the way, just in the snippet you posted, this is very subservient - you didn't react to the fact: key persons/engines of M-SoLow didn't see Morrissey (in concert) over - decade.
I have no reaction. Am I supposed to have a reaction? Do you want me to have a reaction? Is that a fact, I don't know.
 

123xyz

Well-Known Member
Subscriber
It only confirms my belief that Morrissey suffers from a detached personality disorder. I believe that his teenager years were so difficult, and traumatic that he essentially stopped developing emotionally at that time. I think the cruel nature of seventies England, strife at home, and a confused sexuality scarred him emotionally to the point where he couldn't trust people, and develop lasting relationships. I'm sure he was bullied, and that alone can be enough to cause a deep distrust of other people; if not a burning resentment.

Considering the time period, I suspect he didn't experience much nurturing. Fathers weren't raised to nurture their sons, and mothers could be cold; especially in England. His mother sounds fairly doting, but little is known beyond the fact that she let him float. I suspect she saw early signs of his sexuality, and didn't want to pile on. He mentioned that other family members would call her out on being too lenient with him.

On the other hand, it worked out for him. He developed a career where he doesn't have to move on, and one that was probably his only chance at being able to remain independent, and take care of himself. You could even argue that maintaining that adolescent fixation is conducive to sustaining an artist's creativity. The worst thing to happen to aging artists is that they become too practical, and inhibited in their outlook when expressing themselves. Some people see it as growing, but also comes across as boring. If you're not raising children, who cares?

The reality is, post WWII parents created a lot of lingering resentment in their children. I've never heard of a generation before Generation X that seemed to dislike their parents as much as they did. In America, the Vietnam War added to this generational resentment, and the fraying of family bonds. To aspire to your parents life was a form of suicide, or at the very least, a severe form of punishment. Many parents often gave the impression that they didn't even like their children (in the form of "jokes" of course.)

I don't see that same level of resentment in the current generations. Teens seem to have warmer relationships with their parents now. They can converse with them much more freely which creates deeper bonds that last into adulthood.

It's just sad how much social, and political damage the boomer generation has caused. They will go down in history as the most destructive generation. They don't even like themselves.

They created a generation of kids that wanted their parents destroyed, and who could blame them?




I don't necessarily disagree but we have to remember the "boomers" were recovering from a depression and a war. We could argue they had no choice but to cling to conformism and hence had no precedent to pass onto their children ...

Anyhow , an interesting post ...
 

No1uno

Member of the Month™
Subscriber
Hey, wait a minute, everybody just hold on here. Did anybody actually hear these words come out of his mouth?
 

Peterb

Well-Known Member
It only confirms my belief that Morrissey suffers from a detached personality disorder. I believe that his teenager years were so difficult, and traumatic that he essentially stopped developing emotionally at that time. I think the cruel nature of seventies England, strife at home, and a confused sexuality scarred him emotionally to the point where he couldn't trust people, and develop lasting relationships. I'm sure he was bullied, and that alone can be enough to cause a deep distrust of other people; if not a burning resentment.

Considering the time period, I suspect he didn't experience much nurturing. Fathers weren't raised to nurture their sons, and mothers could be cold; especially in England. His mother sounds fairly doting, but little is known beyond the fact that she let him float. I suspect she saw early signs of his sexuality, and didn't want to pile on. He mentioned that other family members would call her out on being too lenient with him.

On the other hand, it worked out for him. He developed a career where he doesn't have to move on, and one that was probably his only chance at being able to remain independent, and take care of himself. You could even argue that maintaining that adolescent fixation is conducive to sustaining an artist's creativity. The worst thing to happen to aging artists is that they become too practical, and inhibited in their outlook when expressing themselves. Some people see it as growing, but also comes across as boring. If you're not raising children, who cares?

The reality is, post WWII parents created a lot of lingering resentment in their children. I've never heard of a generation before Generation X that seemed to dislike their parents as much as they did. In America, the Vietnam War added to this generational resentment, and the fraying of family bonds. To aspire to your parents life was a form of suicide, or at the very least, a severe form of punishment. Many parents often gave the impression that they didn't even like their children (in the form of "jokes" of course.)

I don't see that same level of resentment in the current generations. Teens seem to have warmer relationships with their parents now. They can converse with them much more freely which creates deeper bonds that last into adulthood.

It's just sad how much social, and political damage the boomer generation has caused. They will go down in history as the most destructive generation. They don't even like themselves.

They created a generation of kids that wanted their parents destroyed, and who could blame them?
Really interesting essay. One thing I don't understand though is why English mother's especially would be cold?
 

g23

Always crashing in the same car
It only confirms my belief that Morrissey suffers from a detached personality disorder. I believe that his teenager years were so difficult, and traumatic that he essentially stopped developing emotionally at that time. I think the cruel nature of seventies England, strife at home, and a confused sexuality scarred him emotionally to the point where he couldn't trust people, and develop lasting relationships. I'm sure he was bullied, and that alone can be enough to cause a deep distrust of other people; if not a burning resentment.

Considering the time period, I suspect he didn't experience much nurturing. Fathers weren't raised to nurture their sons, and mothers could be cold; especially in England. His mother sounds fairly doting, but little is known beyond the fact that she let him float. I suspect she saw early signs of his sexuality, and didn't want to pile on. He mentioned that other family members would call her out on being too lenient with him.

On the other hand, it worked out for him. He developed a career where he doesn't have to move on, and one that was probably his only chance at being able to remain independent, and take care of himself. You could even argue that maintaining that adolescent fixation is conducive to sustaining an artist's creativity. The worst thing to happen to aging artists is that they become too practical, and inhibited in their outlook when expressing themselves. Some people see it as growing, but also comes across as boring. If you're not raising children, who cares?

The reality is, post WWII parents created a lot of lingering resentment in their children. I've never heard of a generation before Generation X that seemed to dislike their parents as much as they did. In America, the Vietnam War added to this generational resentment, and the fraying of family bonds. To aspire to your parents life was a form of suicide, or at the very least, a severe form of punishment. Many parents often gave the impression that they didn't even like their children (in the form of "jokes" of course.)

I don't see that same level of resentment in the current generations. Teens seem to have warmer relationships with their parents now. They can converse with them much more freely which creates deeper bonds that last into adulthood.

It's just sad how much social, and political damage the boomer generation has caused. They will go down in history as the most destructive generation. They don't even like themselves.

They created a generation of kids that wanted their parents destroyed, and who could blame them?
What a brilliant and insightful assessment. Sounds pretty spot on. It explains why he keeps going despite common sense dictating that he should stop and take care of his body. It's all he has.
 

g23

Always crashing in the same car
People who grow older, and stop following the culture like they did when they were young, tend to be shocked that anything can possibly still exist after they've ignored it.
It was a comment on disposable print media. I never stopped consuming culture or started ignoring it, I just stopped paying $4.99 for the privilege of wasting paper and reading about Lady Gaga. Shocked yet?
 
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marred

Member
Ah no that's not how it works. Your vote doesn't give you the right to complain. One already has that right. And not voting doesn't remove that right.
Maybe so, but ordinary people all over the world die just to try and vote, so I think that is quite an ignorant thing to say. So you can complain all you want but as far as I am concerned, if you don’t bother to vote I also have the right to say “shut the f*** up and stop complaining and just deal with it.”
Yes you do have that right and you didn't even have to vote to say it.
 
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