Star Interview: Home is where the art is for pioneer Linder Sterling at Chatsworth (Moz mentions)

Star Interview: Home is where the art is for pioneer Linder Sterling at Chatsworth - The Star - Sheffield News

full


Excerpt:

"‘Film portrayal was identity theft’
Linder Sterling was portrayed in a film last year about the early life of Morrissey – but she refuses to watch it. The biopic England Is Mine, directed by Mark Gill, showed the singer-songwriter struggling with life before meeting guitarist Johnny Marr and forming The Smiths. Linder was played by Jessica Findlay Brown; there are scenes of her producing collages and meeting Morrissey for walks around Southern Cemetery in Manchester – excursions later referred to in the Smiths song Cemetry Gates. “I have very little interest,” she insists. “It’s a case of identity theft, really, that somebody is portraying myself. How would anyone feel? I’m almost not wanting it in my head. It came and went so quickly.” Her friendship with Morrissey – who had no involvement in the film – is still strong after 40 years. They write letters and meet up whenever they can. “I think the friendship’s beyond geography. It will just find its own contours depending on where we both are in the world, what we’re both reading and looking at.” Her friend has had to fend off criticism for his statements about immigration and the Hollywood sexual abuse scandal. Does she worry about him? “No, he’s been there before. He’s buoyant. He’s got a sell-out tour happening, so no worries whatsoever. There’ve been so many periods of rough press, haven’t there. It just happens if you’re not toeing the party line. Most British musicians don’t have that many shock-horror headlines about themselves because they don’t say anything of interest.”"


Regards,
FWD.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
A

Anonymous

Guest
what was all that about? I couldn't understand a word of it.

From PJLM

Following "Mexico" Morrissey thanked the audience for the applause by saying "We try to please...", then replied to someone requestion "How Soon Is Now?": "I don't know how soon now is so I can't answer that question." He then proceeded with the customary band introduction: "However, I think some of you know that last year I spent some time in prison... nothing serious, just some petty poisoning, with intent to kill... tabloid journalists can be very touchy... while I was in prison I met some charming musicians who I'd like to introduce... if you don't mind... Oh they mind! First of all would you say hello to my lifelong friend Linder Sterling... (Morrissey goes to the side of the stage where she is positioned taking photographs and hugs her) A wonderful woman... And four other wonderful women are: Boz!... and the two and only Gary!... and the best drummer we've ever had, Deano!... and the highly sophisticated Alain... and I am what's left of Morrissey..."
 

swift eclipse

Active Member
Reckon that B foreigner film is a piece of shit inn nn it. Reckon all I know about Linder is that her son lil' Max and can do some gnarly skateboard tricks down at The Cove Skatepark with lil' Sammy.

I hit the wrong rating earlier. Sorry. Darn icons are so close together and I'm sleepy. Corrected to informative. :thumb:
 

swift eclipse

Active Member
In primary school Moz was called Morrissey. That happened all the time in the UK and Ireland. Not sure about the rest of the world. A lot of kids thought of themselves as surname first, it was just the way it was. Once you reached the safety of home you became your first name again. So Moz was Morrissey years before The Smiths, but he just kept it. A name is a powerful thing.

How does this work exactly though? I mean how often in the day does someone refer to themselves by using their own name or surname as you say in order to "protect" themselves somehow? I can see teachers doing this during roll call but I don't think that's what you meant.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
In primary school Moz was called Morrissey. That happened all the time in the UK and Ireland. Not sure about the rest of the world. A lot of kids thought of themselves as surname first, it was just the way it was. Once you reached the safety of home you became your first name again. So Moz was Morrissey years before The Smiths, but he just kept it. A name is a powerful thing.

That was already incredibly old-fasioned by the 1970s, particularly in the state sector. He will have been Steven in school.
 

terrancestamp

Active Member
Thoughts from skimming...Real name Linda Mulvey...sounds like a housewife...no wonder she changed it to just one name: Linder...wonder if that inspired Morrissey to do the same? She does have a different surname...Sterling...is this her married name or another one made up? Ever notice that Moz used "Linder Ltd." as the name for I think his publishing or company name for merchandising or both...also clever that the writer used 'Home is where the art is' in the title of this piece as it's from the run out groove of Shakespeare's Sister.

Linder is married to author Michael Bracewell
 

Ketamine Sun

A Most Misunderstood Member
BOWIE,BOLAN,DEVOTO,MORRISSEY
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Home Is Where The Art Is - !

What a fantastic interview. Linder is - truly - one of the UK's Leading Artists. I think
- with all honesty - that she has actually been at the very top of her game since 1978 or thereabouts....

Some people just have it. As we know. Class.

Hazard
x
 

Peppermint

Well-Known Member
How does this work exactly though? I mean how often in the day does someone refer to themselves by using their own name or surname as you say in order to "protect" themselves somehow? I can see teachers doing this during roll call but I don't think that's what you meant.
That was already incredibly old-fasioned by the 1970s, particularly in the state sector. He will have been Steven in school.
I think what Acton meant (unless I'm mistaken) is boys referring to each other like that. 'Oi! Morrissey! What are you doing with that yellow streak in your hair, you nancy.' That sort of thing. This was certainly the case when I was at school in the north of England in the 70s/early 80s. Very few of his peer group would have said, 'Hello, Steven,' unless they were taking the piss. It implied too much intimacy and was therefore risky. I think what Anon is referring to is teachers calling pupils only by their surnames, which had certainly died out by the 70s in the state sector (but probably survived a while longer in the private sector).
 
Last edited:
R

Robbie Fun

Guest
Home Is Where The Art Is - !

What a fantastic interview. Linder is - truly - one of the UK's Leading Artists. I think
- with all honesty - that she has actually been at the very top of her game since 1978 or thereabouts....

Some people just have it. As we know. Class.

Hazard
x

I've never heard of her outside the Morrissey complex. Her art is utterly unknown, and she's hardly got looks to fall back on. Yikes
 

joe frady

Vile Refusenik
In primary school Moz was called Morrissey. That happened all the time in the UK and Ireland. Not sure about the rest of the world. A lot of kids thought of themselves as surname first, it was just the way it was. Once you reached the safety of home you became your first name again. So Moz was Morrissey years before The Smiths, but he just kept it. A name is a powerful thing.

Are you sure? Alot of the school 'mates' Rogan talked to refer to him as 'Steve said this...', 'Steve's Mam was hot...' Etc.

Never mention of a nickname neither which í found surprising. Most of us had one in them daze; mine was Sambo (long story), even the teacher's called me it. Never 'appen now, Etc :eek:

.
 

joe frady

Vile Refusenik
This friendship surely is a precious one. Moz is lucky that it didn't end in tragedy in 1997.

[video]

Nice memory ~ í was in the terraces right by the Albert Hall stage that night, about 6 feet away from Linder shooting. í remember her beam after M.'s tribute.

Yet more unseen archive...

.
 

Peppermint

Well-Known Member
Are you sure? Alot of the school 'mates' Rogan talked to refer to him as 'Steve said this...', 'Steve's Mam was hot...' Etc.

Never mention of a nickname neither which í found surprising. Most of us had one in them daze; mine was Sambo (long story), even the teacher's called me it. Never 'appen now, Etc :eek:

.
You've got a point there about Rogan, Joe (or is it Rogan, Josh?). But I'm sure I recall hearing him say once that he did have a nickname but he refused to divulge it because it was too embarrassing? Think it was on the 1984 Earsay interview on Youtube. Although perhaps that's just one of his many 'embellishments', since I'm pretty sure Rogan would have dug it up if he had. Sambo? Good Lord, pretty sure you can be arrested for calling somebody that these days :lbf:
 

joe frady

Vile Refusenik
You've got a point there about Rogan, Joe (or is it Rogan, Josh?). But I'm sure I recall hearing him say once that he did have a nickname but he refused to divulge it because it was too embarrassing? Think it was on the 1984 Earsay interview on Youtube. Although perhaps that's just one of his many 'embellishments', since I'm pretty sure Rogan would have dug it up if he had. Sambo? Good Lord, pretty sure you can be arrested for calling somebody that these days :lbf:

Indeed. It was all very loving in my day (kinda).
í even wore a 'My Name is Sambo' pendant for longer than was strictly necessary.
Bought in a Blackpool kiss-me-quick shop, as í recall.
It was meant for dogs (see "Dambusters" Etc :o) but í saw it and thought 'Woof!'
Words wore off after too many bathtimes.
Then one year they stopped selling them...

.
 

swift eclipse

Active Member
I think what Acton meant (unless I'm mistaken) is boys referring to each other like that. 'Oi! Morrissey! What are you doing with that yellow streak in your hair, you nancy.' That sort of thing. This was certainly the case when I was at school in the north of England in the 70s/early 80s. Very few of his peer group would have said, 'Hello, Steven,' unless they were taking the piss. It implied too much intimacy and was therefore risky. I think what Anon is referring to is teachers calling pupils only by their surnames, which had certainly died out by the 70s in the state sector (but probably survived a while longer in the private sector).

Thanks for clearing up that up. Jeez, how uptight and paranoid are you Brits anyway? Boys scared to call each other by first names for fear of what? Being accused of buggering each other? That's messed up.
 
Last edited:

Peppermint

Well-Known Member
:lbf: Ah, but thems were the bad old days. I have two teenage sons and I don't think either of them followed this pattern with their friends, so perhaps we're a more liberated bunch now.
 

swift eclipse

Active Member
You've got a point there about Rogan, Joe (or is it Rogan, Josh?). But I'm sure I recall hearing him say once that he did have a nickname but he refused to divulge it because it was too embarrassing? Think it was on the 1984 Earsay interview on Youtube. Although perhaps that's just one of his many 'embellishments', since I'm pretty sure Rogan would have dug it up if he had. Sambo? Good Lord, pretty sure you can be arrested for calling somebody that these days :lbf:
Your comment above coupled with your 'yellow streak in his hair' reference in your other post makes me think that 'I know very well how I got my name' could be about his nickname. That title always confused me because I was thinking in terms of his actual name, but a nickname makes much more sense in the context of the lyrics.

Well, that's another one solved! Nice one, mate! (As no one where I live would ever say.) So what was his nickname then? Goldie? Poncey? Bowie? ;)
 
Last edited:
Tags
england is mine movie

Trending Threads

Top Bottom