The exclusive vinyl thread

born to mourn and yawn

Well-Known Member
actually it was the original version of the song Berlin on Lou’s first solo album ( before Transformer)
that Bob Ezrin told Lou that he should expand on and follow a character through the whole album, and so with Bob Ezrin’s brilliant suggestion Berlin a concept album was born.



there is also the early demo a
song called ‘Oh Gin’ which became Oh Jim ....

What came to my mind were two things: I remember reading that Ezrin(?) commented on Lou's song writing saying his songs had very strong beginnings but also very weak endings. He wanted him to change that. Could imagine that this being a concept album gave rise to certain concerns if he would be able to close it meaningfully, and one solution would have been to put the cart before the horse and not the other way round. What I actually wanted to say, and felt like I wasnt heard, was that "Sad Song" is defo the most emotionally powerful and pathbreaking song on the album. This alone could have been a strong inspiration and power source for creating the rest of the album.
But, secondly, now that I am at it, Berlin having been such an unusual musical approach for Lou that it would certainly scare off not a small percentage of his fans, made them look for an official explanation of how the idea was conceived, and it had to be rooted in his older work, so that his longtime fans would still feel included in the departure for new musical expressions. Not saying your theory, which has become the standard explanation, I assume, is wrong, but I am a bit sceptical about it. I mean, these albums have to be marketed somehow.
 
Okay, even though I do not like to bother the young new year with irksome comparisons already, this one really thrusted itself upon me in the most striking way.
View attachment 67184

This is a very beautifully transparent 12" Maxi Blue Single by the Smiths from 1986. There is Panic on the A-Side and Light and Queen on the B-Side. It's a German Teldec/Zensor printing, the one with light blue labels. There is another one with red labels. I got this one from a friend of mine, who had to change places and was happy that someone helped her driving some of her stuff from A to B, which was my pleasure.
A few hairlines but apart from that it is in sublime shape, but how surprised was I, when I played (after a thorough wash and scrub) this 35 year old record on my humble turntable at home.
My God, this sound was so fantastic! It's just like you want to have it, crystal clear and powerful at the same time. The walls were shaking in unison with the thunderbolting heartbeats released by this record. I felt like driving the best Mercedes back home to where it belongs. The top cheese cake. That's the quality every superb music deserves.

View attachment 67185

See above: A work of art and love entwined.

Unfortunately, I cannot say the same about the recent RSD 2020 limited repress in sky blue release of the Delines' otherwise supreme record "The Imperial". I listened to it straight after The Smiths, and the contrast in sound was so very striking, it brought tears to my eyes. I have to add that it was a sealed copy, and shortly after opening it (before it was washed), I noticed how dirty it was, and there were even visible hairlines on it. This was already a bad omen. Also the sky blue color in non-transparent "blue" looked like a sick cat shortly before vomiting.

While listening there were lots of pops and crackles throughout. I couldn't believe what I heared. With quiet music that wants you to listen more closely to beautiful lyrics and enjoy the nuances, this is deadly. I stopped listening altogether after the A-Side. That's the reason why it got only 3 stars from me. I am really sorry, I bought this shoddy RSD release. I am not getting into the question of guilt right now, as this new year is still very young and innocent.

My conclusion was, that I have to download the album in mp3 format. Here it is, hiding itself conscience-stricken on the disc rack behind the Jayhawks. Btw, I feel tempted to add a coppola new 12"es to my improvable 12" single collection in the near future, if god is willing.

View attachment 67186


Ya got that vinyl shinin' like a sapphire.
 

Ketamine Sun

A Most Misunderstood Member
What came to my mind were two things: I remember reading that Ezrin(?) commented on Lou's song writing saying his songs had very strong beginnings but also very weak endings. He wanted him to change that. Could imagine that this being a concept album gave rise to certain concerns if he would be able to close it meaningfully, and one solution would have been to put the cart before the horse and not the other way round. What I actually wanted to say, and felt like I wasnt heard, was that "Sad Song" is defo the most emotionally powerful and pathbreaking song on the album. This alone could have been a strong inspiration and power source for creating the rest of the album.
But, secondly, now that I am at it, Berlin having been such an unusual musical approach for Lou that it would certainly scare off not a small percentage of his fans, made them look for an official explanation of how the idea was conceived, and it had to be rooted in his older work, so that his longtime fans would still feel included in the departure for new musical expressions. Not saying your theory, which has become the standard explanation, I assume, is wrong, but I am a bit sceptical about it. I mean, these albums have to be marketed somehow.


:lbf:

It’s not anyone’s ‘theory’. Bob Ezrin clearly states that the album Berlin started with his suggestion to Lou to follow a character through an album, and Ezrin used the song Berlin to give an example of the possibilities of this.
 

born to mourn and yawn

Well-Known Member
:lbf:

It’s not anyone’s ‘theory’. Bob Ezrin clearly states that the album Berlin started with his suggestion to Lou to follow a character through an album, and Ezrin used the song Berlin to give an example of the possibilities of this.
s.a.
 

born to mourn and yawn

Well-Known Member
Tomorrow... 🤕
a1.jpg
 

born to mourn and yawn

Well-Known Member
Gonna make it short today coz I have a long night of listening to records ahead of me.
c1.jpg


Gonna start with Johnny Cash and then move myself upwards the ascension ladder. I don't have to present myself tomorrow, so that's always a pleasant prospect. I couldn't wash the Rocky Horror Picture Show, coz I forgot that the Gong consists of 2 LPs, so it went back into the "to-be-washed"-box.
Most of these records were basement discoveries at my mum's, the two Lous and Moz and the Smiths I got from a garage sale outside town. Folks are selling stuff to make room for home offices, it seems, or they simply have to pay their bills. The Gong I bought at last year's first RSD day in August, but it wasn't RSD related. The left Phil C I got as a birthday present by a friend in the 80s. There is a card inside saying, "Hi old woman, Happy Birthday!" written in teenage balloon letters and not signed but I think I remember who that was.
The Morrissey 12" made me curious, it's really a minimalist luxury pressing, heavy weight and one can see all the space inbetween the grooves, that's how many ressources were made available for it. I wonder if it will have an effect on the sound quality, as this seems to be the secret behind the super sound of 12" singles. The 10" Smiths record in contrast and according to the theory should sound less powerful than the 12".

Meanwhile, I was listening to .....
c2.jpg


Berlin again. Yeah. I must say, I have grown very fond of this Lou album, especially the scratched b-side.
 
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That live Lou Reed record has my favorite version of Coney Island Baby.
Think I heard somewhere that Lou recorded that album with state-of-the-art
equipment so I'm kinda wonderin' if the sound quality is real good on vinyl.
 

born to mourn and yawn

Well-Known Member
That live Lou Reed record has my favorite version of Coney Island Baby.
Think I heard somewhere that Lou recorded that album with state-of-the-art
equipment so I'm kinda wonderin' if the sound quality is real good on vinyl.
Hey Turkey. I wanted to make sure that I can respond to ya inquiry properly, man, so I put on my headphones while listenin' to side C. And yeah, there is a difference to be noticed, not always though, mostly in the quiter parts, like at the beginning of songs, or when Lou is ramblin' on without much accompaniment on Wild Side. A spatial quality, not a far-reaching and soaring one, but a smaller and clear 3-dimensional room, that opens up around ya ears, and ya feel as if there is some space inbetween ya and the singer or musicians. So, the music is kinda taken out of ya ears and put around the head, if you know what I mean. This happens here and there, not always, and then it feels like a lil concert experience at home. It only works with them headphones on, not with them loudspeakers.

So, what'ya like in particular about that version of CIB?
My impression is that this is probably not his most inspired live performance, and maybe they had to add the binaural dummy head sound to counterbalance a rather, I think, unenergetic performance. Cursin' a lot doesn't help either. But I think Manfred Schunke (pron.: shoo'n'qué, not skunky) did a good job here, like on Street Hassle too.
 

born to mourn and yawn

Well-Known Member
The Johnny Cash record surprised me in a pleasant way.
d1.jpg


This is a budget pressing on the Contour label. It was purchased for 1.05 pounds somewhere in Ireland probably in the late 60s or early 70s. Keeping in mind that this record is most likely 50+ years old and shows signs of condensation and heat damage, the sound is still pretty good.
The compilation starts off with one of my fav Hank Williams songs, Cold Cold Heart, and it seems they wanted to draw a traditional line between the older generation of country stars and Johnny Cash. But I must say that I still prefer Lucinda Williams' cover of CCH, which can be found on a Hank Williams Tribute CD that I have here too, and Johnny Cash is featured on this tribute with "Last Night I dreamed about Mama" instead.

As to be expected, it is a manly compilation, a pithy succession of 2-minute songs, delivered one after the other in the snappy masculine Cash way.

 
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Hey Turkey. I wanted to make sure that I can respond to ya inquiry properly, man, so I put on my headphones while listenin' to side C. And yeah, there is a difference to be noticed, not always though, mostly in the quiter parts, like at the beginning of songs, or when Lou is ramblin' on without much accompaniment on Wild Side. A spatial quality, not a far-reaching and soaring one, but a smaller and clear 3-dimensional room, that opens up around ya ears, and ya feel as if there is some space inbetween ya and the singer or musicians. So, the music is kinda taken out of ya ears and put around the head, if you know what I mean. This happens here and there, not always, and then it feels like a lil concert experience at home. It only works with them headphones on, not with them loudspeakers.

So, what'ya like in particular about that version of CIB?
My impression is that this is probably not his most inspired live performance, and maybe they had to add the binaural dummy head sound to counterbalance a rather, I think, unenergetic performance. Cursin' a lot doesn't help either. But I think Manfred Schunke (pron.: shoo'n'qué, not skunky) did a good job here, like on Street Hassle too.

Likin' how Lou sings the whole first part of Coney Island Baby on the live record instead of
how he just talks it more on the studio version.
Some of them parts are great like "The strangest dude I ever knew..." "When ya all alone and
lonely..." "Hey Lou Reed, you'll never be a human bein'..." and then at the end when he says
"Sorry it took awhile." Haha.
The piano is great on this, especially when he starts poundin' the keys.
Some great background vocals on this thing too.
Guess it's one of my favorite Lou Reed songs.

Here's the part of the recording process I was thinkin' of:
"Live: Take No Prisoners was recorded during the series of albums where Reed employed the use of a
binaural recording setup, using a dummy head with microphones in each ear."
 

born to mourn and yawn

Well-Known Member
I have been listening to the A-Side of Lou Reed's "Sally Can't Dance" lately and also thoroughly.
t1.jpg


This is a 1974 UK stereo copy on the RCA Victor label. Not in best shape, the sound is pretty muffled, but actually, I find this quite conducive to my mind at the moment. Highly enjoyable A-side consisting of four songs.

Ride Sally Ride is a nice opener, bugle-intro and all, with poor Sally being gang-raped? The second song is Animal Language, my favorite on this side, as my cats and I can sing along in unison to this one. The third song, Baby Face, I find a bit boring musically. Too bluesy for my taste. New York Stars, number four, is a great song, and it kinda sounds different to the other three, clearer and more spacious. Not sure if this is material related or if they were experiencing with binaural sounds again.

t2.jpg


Here it is, all brushed and scrubbed. Will defo listen to it more often.
 

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