The Smiths nominated for Rock 'n Roll Hall of Fame 2015

Re: Vote for the 2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductees (including The Smiths)

No thanks.

The Smiths is against the establishment, no need to be included in a showbiz shoulder-patting crowd.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
honestly that just sounds so super boring. id rather try and pick which will win and what five i think will actually be nominated. as to who will be nominated i think itll go like this, lou stevie, sting, chic, green day. lou will win
 

evennow

Writers on the storm
Okay, just for the fun of speculating - let's say all four of them bit the bullet and did it. And performed. And this was gonna be the only Smiths reunion ever.

What song(s) would they perform? Isn't it tradition to do three? I can't remember.

I'd expect "How Soon is Now?" "There is A Light," and the highlight, "Hand in Glove." A surprise from "Strangeways" would be nice, though.

Nice thought, but there is a zero percent chance that they will reform and play...even for one night. In order to do so they would have to practice. There is no way Moz is going to spend more than the time it takes to accept their award on stage with MJ. Even that is a stretch, but if they stand on opposite sides with Andy and John in the middle it just might work.
 

docinwestchester

Well-Known Member
http://music-mix.ew.com/2014/10/14/the-smiths-rock-and-roll-hall-of-fame/


What would a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction mean for The Smiths?
By Jason Heller on Oct 14, 2014 at 12:00PM



Earlier this month, The Smiths’ former members didn’t have much reason to be happy. Guitarist Johnny Marr released his second solo album, Playland—and while he probably likes the music on it, it’s a middling effort that shows a marked lack of spark, soul, and originality. Singer Morrissey, the more famous half of The Smiths’ songwriting core, then made a disheartening statement: His recent string of concert cancellations are at least partly due to undisclosed problems with “cancerous tissues.” Leave it to Morrissey to be poetically abstruse while giving a medical update.

Coincidentally, both instances happened on the same day: October 7. Or was it a coincidence? Over the years, Morrissey has proven himself to be a spiteful fellow. Recently, he was even accused of ordering a bodyguard to assault a man who runs a Morrissey fan site. Did Moz purposefully withhold news of his illness until the day of Marr’s album release, in some kind of peevish attempt to steal his former bandmate’s thunder?

If he did—which, to be honest, is the idlest of speculation—it wouldn’t be all that surprising. Since disbanding acrimoniously in 1987, the Smiths have famously not gotten along. They’ve repeatedly turned down offers for reunions that would have netted them millions. Why? All his vague talk of “been there, done that” aside, Morrissey made it plain in his autobiography from last year: After years of legal wrangling, mostly over money, he and Marr just plain don’t like each other.

Soon, though, The Smiths may have yet another reason to get back together: On October 9, they were nominated for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

There have been enough debates about the Hall of Fame—is it oblivious? Is it rockist? Does it even matter?—to fill a thousand thinkpieces. But for the sake of simplicity, let’s assume that one fact is inarguable: The annual brouhaha over the Hall of Fame’s lists of nominees and inductees lends the institution a kind of catalytic relevance. Let’s also acknowledge that being inducted means getting invited to the awards ceremony, which in turn means an open offer for inductees to perform.

But should they? Hall of Fame reunions are notoriously hit-or-miss propositions; for every stately, impeccable Talking Heads, there’s a sloppy, bickering, ill-prepared, gratuitously guested Led Zeppelin. In their day, The Smiths were a powerful live band—even if their one official live album, 1988’s Rank, relied on the group’s fleeting second guitarist Craig Gannon to fill out the intricately overdubbed guitars that Marr laid down on classic studio albums like 1985’s Meat Is Murder and 1986’s The Queen Is Dead.

If there’s one thing made clear by Marr’s Playland and Morrissey’s own lackluster 2014 solo album, it’s that the duo can still play and sing. To this day, Morrissey regularly works Smiths songs into his solo sets, and he can still knock them out of the park. Bassist Andy Rourke and drummer Mike Joyce haven’t been as prominently active, but it’s safe to assume that The Smiths’ rhythm section, one of the most supple and inventive of the ’80s, can still bring it.

But The Smiths aren’t simply one of the greatest and most influential bands of their era, innovators both instrumentally and lyrically. Their fans are also, well, fanatical. The cult of Morrissey still inspires tears, demonstrations of tattoos, and wholesale shirt-rending at his shows; a Smiths reunion behind the closed doors of the Hall of Fame’s induction ceremony next April might just send the church of The Smiths into a crisis of faith. Unless, of course, an entire reunion tour is concurrently announced, which seems less likely as time goes by—and that’s with the hope that Morrissey’s vague self-diagnosis is more hopeful than he’s hinted. “If I die, then I die,” he said when he announced his illness. Coming from a singer who’s sung about death both cheekily and morbidly, often at the same time, in the past, it’s hard to know for sure.

This is all just more speculation. There’s no guarantee The Smiths will actually be inducted into the Hall of Fame when the winning list is announced in December. After all, they’re up against a solid roster of fellow 2015 nominees: Chic, Green Day, Joan Jett and the Blackhearts, Kraftwerk, The Marvelettes, Nine Inch Nails, NWA, The Paul Butterfield Blues Band, Lou Reed, The Spinners, Sting, Stevie Ray Vaughan, War, and Bill Withers. The best case scenario is that they’ll not only be inducted, but that this honor (whether it’s dubious one or not) might catalyze a Smiths-reunion chain reaction. Maybe one Smiths fan in a million has ever had the opportunity to see them—and for a band stereotyped as introspective and mopey, videos from the ’80s prove that they were a generous, electrifying live act.

But then there’s Morrissey, who also said this in his recent statement to the press: “I’m now at an age when I should no longer be making music. […] With luck I will be able to stop singing forever, which would make many people happy!” Morrissey certainly has as many rabid detractors as devoted followers, but one thing is certain now: The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and by extension the pop-music canon, has embraced The Smiths. If the band choose not to take full advantage of that, should they be inducted, it would end The Smiths’ legacy with a bang as well as a whimper.
 

Chickpea

pithy yet degenerate
Meanwhile, in the NME...
http://www.nme.com/blogs/nme-blogs/spare-the-smiths-from-hall-of-fame-hell


Spare The Smiths From Hall Of Fame Hell

By Mark Beaumont

The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame: the place where the light finally goes out. It’s rock's House Of Lords, where ancient relics of the rock age are inducted once doctors have confirmed that their primary creative functions have shut down for good. To be inducted is less an honour, more an invitation to a never-ending whist drive at the rock’n’roll retirement village. It also seems to be a curse for bands inducted while still functioning: REM split four years after their big night, and U2, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Guns N’Roses and more have all seen career downturns since theirs. But what do you expect from embracing a naff old-blokes’ institution so rockist that Gene Simmons of Kiss thought he could rightfully argue against the inclusion of Run-DMC, Donna Summer and Grandmaster Flash because “they sample and they talk. Not even sing!” That quote isn’t from 1867, but 2014.

Last year the ceremony had great success with its star-studded induction of Nirvana, which saw Dave Grohl and Krist Novoselic playing alongside Kim Gordon, St Vincent, Joan Jett and Lorde. This year, they might be hoping for an equally headline-grabbing night courtesy of The Smiths, who are nominated alongside Lou Reed, Nine Inch Nails, Green Day, Chic, Sting and more. Well, dream on. While you can imagine Morrissey – a Penguin Classics author who has clearly dreamt of living in antiquity surrounded by tragic figures from golden eras past – feeling at home among the monochrome portraits of The Flamingos, Jelly Roll Morton and Billy Ming And The Minging Mingettes, The Smiths’ creative core is far too alive and kicking right now to be mothballed for posterity.

Johnny Marr is powering through a long-awaited solo career, knocking out a vital and demon-driven album every year. Morrissey, even while battling serious illness, as was revealed last week, has just released one of the most exploratory and innovative albums of his life in 'World Peace Is None Of Your Business', and looks to be reaching new peaks in his latest solo spurt. These aren’t men who'd want to nod humbly along to the idea that their best work is 30 years behind them: they’re just too now.

And as for the RARHOF tradition of the band reuniting to play the ceremony, they’d have better luck getting The Ramones back together. In 2009, Marr told XFM that the band had turned down £50 million to play just a handful of dates. In 2006 Morrissey stated that “I would rather eat my own testicles than reform The Smiths, and that’s saying something for a vegetarian.” The last time most of them clapped eyes on each other was in court. I’m not saying it’ll never happen, but we can be pretty sure it’ll never happen in return for a plastic gong, a chance to meet Linda Ronstadt and lifelong free entry to a shit museum in Cleveland, Ohio.

And quite right too. As sad as it was to see The Clash, the Stooges and the Sex Pistols inducted – proud anti-establishment forces neutered, tamed and absorbed into the anodyne heritage machine – The Smiths still represent a living outsider ethos, a band that rallies musicians and fans who find the idea of mainstream acceptance distasteful to this day. They pioneered the modern idea of the alternative, embodied the nobly misaligned, tragic poet in us all, and their legacy and ideology is still thriving, their offspring still vehemently – and romantically – independence-minded. They're the absolute antithesis of the RARHOF's aspic-sealed rock'n'roll Tussauds. They still matter. So hands off our Smiths; take Sting instead, no-one will miss him.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Can someone phone Mike Joyce and tell him to start voting? You know he would show up to play.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
yeah but they didnt influence nearly as many or reached as many as green day who did not write songs about girls and broken hearts but about the life of many a young american man. many many people couldnt even name one smiths song. not one and they never sold or reached that many people. sure those who it did reach were very effeceted but in a rock and roll hall of fame i think the popular vote for sure means something and is relevant.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
not only was nine inch nail embraced by alt classic rock leaning bands and artists like bowie hes had some really well recieved album and sales with his comeback albums. surprise but not to to much. im very surprised that joan jett is so many places high than lou. that shocked me. berlin is staggeringly good and there are so many other albums. wonder if that one he did with metallica, lou lou i think, did his chances in a bit
 

docinwestchester

Well-Known Member
http://www.rollingstone.com/music/n...lead-2015-rock-and-roll-hall-of-fame-20141216

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame has officially announced next year's inductees: Lou Reed, Green Day, Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble, Joan Jett and the Blackhearts, Bill Withers and the Paul Butterfield Blues Band will all join the class of 2015. Ringo Starr will be given the Award For Musical Excellence and 1950s R&B group the "5" Royales will receive the Early Influence Award.
 

Chickpea

pithy yet degenerate
Really happy to see Joan Jett make it in—absolutely deserved. Love her to death, and I'm sure her speech will be fantastic.

And Lou, of course.
 

fabval

Member
The Velvet Underground was already honoured in the past, if my memory serves. Lou obviously is the most important singer/composer to have passed away these last 12 months.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
the velvet underground included cale as a song writer so he was honored along with that induction as well. this is for lous solo work and the records he made alone or at least not with cale except for songs for drella.
 

grenj76

New Member
Rock 'n Roll Hall of Fame 2015!! How exciting!! I want Joan Jett & the Blackhearts to win. You know guys I have met this team in banquet halls in Miami . Actually they came there to attend a function and I was also there. It was great meeting them.
 
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cancer hall of fame marr morrissey the smiths

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