Understanding 'The Bleak Moor Lies'

saw76

New Member
Ever since reading this I have been wrestling with an interpretation of the title of the piece. The optins I have come up with are that a) the 'Bleak Moor' is telling lies to the people who venture into its bleak landscape, although for what reason I do not know. Maybe because it will not reveal its truth due to a perverse desire to keep its secrets to itself. b) The 'Bleak Moor' simply lies there as in geographically lying in a specific location. It is immovable and monolithic. or c) Morrissey is telling us lies about his experiences on the 'Bleak Moor'. If anyone has any opinions on this matter please feel free to comment as I am interested in getting a debate started regarding a literary interpretation of this short piece. Personally I believe that option a is the most attractive to me as an interpretation.
 
I agree out of your 3 I like option (a) the best. But due to his tendency in songs to use words with multiple meanings and implications I think he could be hinting at all three. His description of the landscape paints a vivid picture in my mind of the moors, and I was thinking among other things the nighttime bleakness vs its relative innocence in the daytime was the "lie."
 

saw76

New Member
Ohh I like that, the Moor lies because it conceals its true nature during the day. I too considered that there was an ambiguity at work in the title of the piece that allows a multiplicity of interpretations.
 

Julie-Budd

New Member
We shall not forget

Reggie and Ronny
Patrick Doonan
the blue lamp

I hope the new bio holds some new infos on them
Moz shall give us details in his interest in crime in general
the Moor murderers are just one single issue
but maybe the most influential...

Julie-Budd
 

jamescagney

Stood at the urinal
But due to his tendency in songs to use words with multiple meanings and implications I think he could be hinting at all three.

Agree with this. I doubt there is just one meaning.
 

saw76

New Member
The words come from Dickens' "Dombey And Sons". Perhaps Morrissey simply like the way those words sounded and we are trying to read too much into them.

Stephane

Oh that is such a prosaic explanation, I am rather disappointed. Im a keen Dickens fan too so am slightly embarrassed that I didn't recognise the quote.
 
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