What's Everyone Reading At The Moment?

kissmyshadestoo

Cheeky Defendant
No One Would Listen: by Harry Markopolos..........a book about the Madoff scandal.
 

mauve21

Long time participant
The Collected Stories - Katherine Mansfield.
It's one of my son's english literature books. I've borrowed it because he's got about twelve he has to read so he doesn't
need it at the moment.
 

Emil

A Burnt Child
The last couple of days I have been reading Die Schlafwandler (The Sleepwalkers), a trilogy of novels written between 1928-1932, by the austrian author Hermann Broch. So far I'm almost finished wth the first novel, Pasenow, or the Romanticism, and I like it a lot. I look forward to the following two parts.
 

Oh my god. it's Robby!

spontaneously luminescent

& I only paid $2(used, of course) for it :)
 

M-in-Oz

Active Member
I finished Tuesday's With Morrie and it was pretty good - I'm now reading Atonement as it was first on the stack of books next to my bed.
 

Librarian On Fire

Active Member
Finished "Good-bye To All That" the autobiography of Robert Graves. Follows up on my World War One reading. Now I'm quickly getting through "The Secret of Chanel No.5. The Intimate History of the World's Most Famous Perfume", by Tilar J.Mazzeo. It's alright. The one I love wears No.5. Tis a lovely scent.
 
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goinghome

Guest
I'm halfway through "Seeing Green: Politics of Ecology Explained" by Jonathon Porritt. Someone lent it to me, I think it's out of print which is shocking especially given how relevent all the ideas still are e.g. danger of nuclear power. The author remains publicly active, with BBC broadcasts and a blog - http://www.jonathonporritt.com/pages/
 

Emil

A Burnt Child
At the moment I'm re-reading Die Leiden des jungen Werthers (The Sorrows of Young Werther) by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. I really, really like this novel.
 
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goinghome

Guest
At the moment I'm re-reading Die Leiden des jungen Werthers (The Sorrows of Young Werther) by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. I really, really like this novel.

That book had supernatural powers. Goethe based it on his own experience of a love triangle that ended on a major depressive note for himself, which he got over. The book, though, was blamed for causing a wave of suicides across Europe by those infatuated with the romantic despair he did so well. I must say that I've read more about it, than the text itself. I must take a look soon.:)
 
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goinghome

Guest

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Graveyard_Book - sounds really fascinating. I hadn't heard of it.

I took a few people for tea to the 5* hotel in Killarney where Morrissey stayed, the Aghadoe Heights, when I was down there recently. It's actually opposite a big graveyard set around the ruins of an old monastery founded by one St. Finan The Leper in the 7th century, and it overlooks lakes and mountains as per attached photos.
1103 View from Aghadoe Heights Hotel Killarney 3.jpg 1103 View from Aghadoe Heights Hotel Killarney 2.jpg 1103 View from Aghadoe Heights Hotel Killarney.jpg

While there, this song came on - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rt7SPm7N6D8&feature=related - which made me happy. Can you place it?
 
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goinghome

Guest

Emil

A Burnt Child
That book had supernatural powers. Goethe based it on his own experience of a love triangle that ended on a major depressive note for himself, which he got over. The book, though, was blamed for causing a wave of suicides across Europe by those infatuated with the romantic despair he did so well. I must say that I've read more about it, than the text itself. I must take a look soon.:)

I actually saw a film, it was simply called Goethe!, depicting that last fall but I suppose it was quite fictionalized. It was basically Goethe in the role of Werther with the difference that he didn't kill himself at the end. And the so-called Werther-fever is something really interesting. Young men dressing themselves like Werther in blue coats and yellow vests and shooting themselves just because Werther did. Reality imitates art indeed. And I really recommend you to read the book. It's fantastic.
 
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goinghome

Guest
I actually saw a film, it was simply called Goethe!, depicting that last fall but I suppose it was quite fictionalized. It was basically Goethe in the role of Werther with the difference that he didn't kill himself at the end. And the so-called Werther-fever is something really interesting. Young men dressing themselves like Werther in blue coats and yellow vests and shooting themselves just because Werther did. Reality imitates art indeed. And I really recommend you to read the book. It's fantastic.

I will, thanks. Got it book-marked here online - http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/2527 - for viewing shortly. ;)
 
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books wit no pitchers but not much more just fuck off literary ponces long live books more to life than books nerds n squares obscurer and obscurer shakespeare is smart
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