What's Everyone Reading At The Moment?

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KenzieW

Guest
I am now reading "Jane Eyre" by Charlotte Bronte. I watched one of the movies a few years ago, but this is my first time reading the book. I wasn't sure if I was going to like it because I usually get confused when I try to read old smart books, but this book isn't confusing at all and I am really liking it so far. I like Charlotte Bronte's writing style, the story is interesting, and I love the character of Jane. I can't wait to read more later.
 

Emil

A Burnt Child
I'm re-reading Demian by Herman Hesse. I love Hesse. He's one of my top-three favourite authors.
 

Oh my god. it's Robby!

spontaneously luminescent
On Monday I checked out:
The_Brooklyn_Follies_bookcover.jpg

& I finished it by yesterday afternoon, it was gr8, one of Paul Auster's best
if you like any of his other books then I am sure you will like this one. :)
moving on, left with nothing new to read and having just gone through a bunch of my old books my mother has kept for years and years :guitar:
well last night I started re-reading my old dog eared and written in the margins copy of
charles-dickens-great-expectations.jpg

which it turns out is as good as I remember it :eek:
and reading it now has served as a reminder that my pursuit of "unattainable women"(such as Pip's for Estella :blushing:)
goes back even farther than I ever imagined :cool:
 

Oh my god. it's Robby!

spontaneously luminescent
oracle1.jpg

its gr8, of course, I am gonna read it slow though, since I have almost read all of his stuff now :straightface:
also, I checked out:
The-Procrastination-Equation-Steel-Piers-9780061703614.jpg

I have not started it yet though, obviously :cool: otherwise I would not be here :rolleyes:
 

M-in-Oz

Active Member
The Procrastination book could be good for me too.

I'm reading the Billy Bragg book 'The Progressive Patriot' - got it at the Borders closing down sale.
 

Emil

A Burnt Child
I'm currently reading Die letzten Tage der Menschheit (The Last Days of Mankind); Karl Kraus 700-page play about World War I and all of its insanity.
 

Oh my god. it's Robby!

spontaneously luminescent
So my mom sometimes I read books that she has just read. :crazy: Likely, it usually just so that I take them back to the library for her. :cool:
I mean, her tastes rarely run the same as mine. :straightface:
However, Monday she gave me
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this book, I only started reading it because the authour sounded vaguely familiar :confused:
& had won some award named after "PKD" :rolleyes:
but surprisingly, its actually quite good, I am almost done with it and plan on finding more by this author :guitar:
 

Walkers Crisp

Nobody's Nothing
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In 1948, in a Greek mountain village, Eleni Gatzoyiannis was arrested, tortured and shot.She was one of the 158,000 victims of the Greek Civil War.Her crime had been to help her children escape from the Communist guerrillas who occupied their village.Her son, Nicholas Gage, was then eight years old.Eleni is the story of his obsessive and harrowing reconstruction of his mother’s life and death and his pursuit of his mother’s killer
 
K

KenzieW

Guest
The Gathering - Kelley Armstrong
I am really liking it. I am going to be so impatient for the next book. It doesn't come out until next year.
 

Mars_Rover

Junior Member
Wow, you guys are so intellectual and high-brow. I'm currently devouring "Furious Love" about the Taylor-Burton romance. It's like eating potato chips, it isn't good for me but I cannot stop.

article_2739_pAbjaE7kTu.jpg
 
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Librarian On Fire

Active Member
I've finished "Travels In Siberia" by Ian Frazier. Lucky sod got to travel to Siberia three times. The book is one of those travel, discriptions, social life and customs (to use the library cataloguing keywords. One of the better books about Russia that I have read, and I read a lot of them.

Now onto "The Best American Nonrequired Reading 2010" edited by Dave Eggers. Quite popular with the hipsters I believe. Or with those few hipsters who actually read. It's good.
 

Emil

A Burnt Child
Jeder stirbt für sich allein (Every Man Dies Alone) by Hans Fallada. I like it a lot. I like Fallada in general a lot.
 
G

goinghome

Guest
Jeder stirbt für sich allein (Every Man Dies Alone) by Hans Fallada. I like it a lot. I like Fallada in general a lot.

Don't know this, but it sounds intriguing enough to look up later.

I've started on 'Simulacra and Simulation' by Jean Baudrillard which says, from a cultural and metaphysical point of view, it's all over for the human race. But he says it with exceedingly apt vocabulary and penetrating observations and references. It's well known that the film, The Matrix, drew inspiration from this book. A little overview of the ideas contained therein is here - http://www.cla.purdue.edu/english/theory/postmodernism/modules/baudlldsimultnmainframe.html
 

Emil

A Burnt Child
Don't know this, but it sounds intriguing enough to look up later.

I've started on 'Simulacra and Simulation' by Jean Baudrillard which says, from a cultural and metaphysical point of view, it's all over for the human race. But he says it with exceedingly apt vocabulary and penetrating observations and references. It's well known that the film, The Matrix, drew inspiration from this book. A little overview of the ideas contained therein is here - http://www.cla.purdue.edu/english/theory/postmodernism/modules/baudlldsimultnmainframe.html

The book is definitely worth to be looked up. Never wrong with a little nuance in regards to germans and nazism. And while on the subject of Fallada I would also say that his novel Little Man, What Now? also is well worth looking up. It was actually Morrissey's reference to this title that got me interested in Fallada in the first place.
 
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books wit no pitchers but not much more just fuck off literary ponces long live books more to life than books nerds n squares obscurer and obscurer shakespeare is smart
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