What's Everyone Reading At The Moment?

Oh my god. it's Robby!

spontaneously luminescent
anyways, now I am going to read:
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leave.gif
it was awesome, I give it an A+ :)
next up:
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Emil

A Burnt Child
I'm reading an essay entitled Draculas Vermächtnis (Draculas Heritage) by the germanist Friedrich Kittler.
 

StrangeLilGirl!

New Member
I want to read Dante's Inferno next, but do you people know if you can get it in English anywhere? For, you see, I do not speak Latin or in whatever language it's written. ^^;
 

sad veiled bride

can you please stop time?
I want to read Dante's Inferno next, but do you people know if you can get it in English anywhere? For, you see, I do not speak Latin or in whatever language it's written. ^^;

It's written in Italian, "vulgar" actually, that is medieval Italian. You can surely get it in English. You made a very good choice, SLG, Dante's Inferno is incredible...:thumb:You could be my perfect pupil! Italian students are generally annoyed and bored when they have to read Dante, because they have to read it, at school, and so they try to avoid it somehow or to read it badly just to get a 6/10, you know. And they have no idea what they miss. Well, I hope you read it...let me know if you want :)
 

StrangeLilGirl!

New Member
Haha, oke :) I'll see if they got 'm in a local library, and if they don't I might just buy it somewhere when I got money again ;)

Reading Lonesome Traveller by Jack Kerouac at the moment, but I don't think I'll finish it, his grammar annoys the hell out of me, he hardly uses comma's and it's really American..
 
G

goinghome

Guest
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M-in-Oz

Active Member
I'm still only up to chapter 3 of 'Freedom', started reading it last year! Just hasn't grabbed me yet. I did however manage to find time to read the latest 'Sex and the City' prequel novel, so not sure what that says about my priorities at the present.
Today, I am re-reading parts of Alain De Botton's 'The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work', hoping to find a really good quote.
 

Raphael Lambach

Well-Known Member
That's a coincidence. I was just about to post that I read his latest tome, Freedom, which is, to be fair, quite good and a lot about us, or more accurately, American us which of course is including more and more of everyone to date. This review covers it - http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7905092-freedom . Thanks for the clip, it's interesting to hear him speak now.
I knew him through an interview publish in Paris Review and translated to Portuguese on a Brazilian magazine Serrote. I loved his words and I was really interested in him. Then I bought "The Discomfort Zone" and now "Freedom" - which was relesead in Brazil this month.
 
G

goinghome

Guest
I'm still only up to chapter 3 of 'Freedom', started reading it last year! Just hasn't grabbed me yet. I did however manage to find time to read the latest 'Sex and the City' prequel novel, so not sure what that says about my priorities at the present.
Today, I am re-reading parts of Alain De Botton's 'The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work', hoping to find a really good quote.

I had that and gave it away last year though probably shouldn't have as it was a well-crafted book, with loads of photos. Some parts appealed more than others e.g. the chapter about the guidance counsellor; a paragraph here and there on past attitudes to work, plus the piece on robotics which contained some pithy observations, that the promise of machines with A.I. being around the corner over the past 200 years is a little like a Samuel Beckett play, 'Waiting for Robot'! (I think it was in that book anyway).

Strage - Loriano Macchiavelli.

Sounds good.:thumb:
 

Black Cloud

Case Sensitive
...however much we may be wearied by banality
in others, it does not seem sinful to us in ourselves.
When we are bored with our own sameness, we believe
that something outside us is boring us ; we do not under-
stand that the wages of banality is boredom, or that a
great part of our most disastrous folly, and even wicked-
ness, is the result of that boredom and of the blind effort
to escape from it by means of some crude external excite-
ment.
- A. Glutton Brock
 

Emil

A Burnt Child
I'm reading Bonjour Tristesse by Francoise Sagan. The translation is a bit dated but I like it.
 
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books wit no pitchers but not much more just fuck off literary ponces long live books more to life than books nerds n squares obscurer and obscurer shakespeare is smart
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