Johnny Marr on Tony Fletcher Smiths book - excerpt from Mojo (Aug. 2016)

An anonymous person posted the tweet (original post):


@WholeHogg
Some love for @tonyfletcher 's Smiths book from @Johnny_Marr in the new @MOJOmagazine #MozArmy

38803_marr_mojo_excerpt.jpg




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Calamine Lotion

Well-Known Member
If he wasn't aware of Dale Hibbert's book how does he know it is a total load of shit?
I also think it's pretty funny that he thinks people that will buy his book have a certain intelligence and certain interests. I guess his fans are discerning and possess superior intellect.
The truth is his fans are very loyal because he hasn't given them much to sustain their interest over the past decades. I really think that Frank Zappa title "Shut up and play your guitar" is the best advice anyone could give Marr.
 

Southport Grandma

Active Member
I'm referencing who he believed planted the break-up story in the NME. Also the part where what was exactly discussed in Geale's seems to have altered slightly over the years. In one interview I also remember him stating that it was always his intention to form the band and then leave the band. Interesting in as much as if that was his intention from the beginning I don't think he ever told the rest of the band that. I've heard him say that if he had been given some space he would have probably returned to the band. I've also heard him say that after the Geale's meeting he was adamant he'd never return to the band. I've also heard him say the band brke up because musically he felt too con fined. I've also heard him say that he left the band because Morrissey had simply become too much.

Didn't Johnny Marr tell the others he had enough of all that "Saturday Night, Sunday Morning" stuff and quiffs?

Its probably not unrelated that Morrissey then called his first solo single "Suedehead".

Equally, it seemed poignant that Johnny chose to use a sample from, I think, the "Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner" when he played the Night & Day and Deaf Institute the other year.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
So Johnny remembers most of the things in Tony Fletchers book happening? Might be because these are his memories and he talked to Tony about them. And it might be because these are the memories of people close to him and they talked to Tony about them. How predictable.

He also spoke to Rogan for 'The Severed Alliance, but that doesn't stop him thinking it's a shitty book.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I haven't seen much revisionism in Johnny's given reasons for leaving the Smiths. The crucial point seems that it is reasons plural - not one specific incident: starting to feel musically restricted by the band; Morrissey being very difficult to work with on a professional basis by blowing out video shoots/tours/refusing to pay people; no manager; everyone close to him getting hacked out of the picture by a jealous Morrissey; getting sucked into Morrissey's mind-games as the relationship between them broke down, with the planted story in the NME that he was leaving being the final straw that broke the camel's back. There doesn't have to be one, clear singular reason for leaving - just a whole bunch of stuff on one side that gradually tipped things over to a state where it was better to get the hell out than remain.
 

ACTON

Don't Leave Us In The Dark
I can't wait for Marr's book... not for his account of what went down in The Smiths but because he's worked with tons of talented people in the years since and I'm sure he's hung out with tons more. As for The Smiths break-up stuff? I'm sure his side of the story would be a little more true to life than Morrissey's but still just more of he said she said. I'd be curious to hear about their recording sessions and whatnot- interesting stories from the road during and after his time with The Smiths. The only non-Smiths Moz stuff I'd be interested in reading in Marr's book is his take on Morrissey's solo work and maybe what he thinks of his (Moz's) songwriting partners past and present. But he's always claimed not to follow Morrissey's career so I know that isn't going to happen (I believe he did follow it to a point but follows the "if you don't have anything nice to say..." philosophy.)
Hopefully he will spend more than a few pages on The Smiths and will resist the temptation to write an 80 page rant about the court case. One thing is for certain: it will be a more structured enlightening read than the stream of consciousness Moz autobiography.
I would be interested to read about Marr's experiences with Electronic and The The (and Kirsty McColl too).
 

ACTON

Don't Leave Us In The Dark
I'm referencing who he believed planted the break-up story in the NME. Also the part where what was exactly discussed in Geale's seems to have altered slightly over the years. In one interview I also remember him stating that it was always his intention to form the band and then leave the band. Interesting in as much as if that was his intention from the beginning I don't think he ever told the rest of the band that. I've heard him say that if he had been given some space he would have probably returned to the band. I've also heard him say that after the Geale's meeting he was adamant he'd never return to the band. I've also heard him say the band brke up because musically he felt too con fined. I've also heard him say that he left the band because Morrissey had simply become too much.
English bands often burn the brightest and have changed the face of music forever. My favourite bands are English. They also seem to be more fickle than other countries and fall out after a few albums (Smiths, Suede, The Specials, etc). Maybe it's the artistic spark that is too hot to hold, maybe it goes to their heads. I know Marr once said The Smiths had disappeared up their own arses thinking themselves more important than everyone else. Sure, cockiness is a good motivator but Moz pulled the piss throughout The Smiths. No manager was good enough. Elbowed out Joe Moss cos he was too close to Marr. Didn't turn up for Wogan and other shows. Fired people via childish postcards. Had to be asked numerous times before he would walk on stage. Refused to meet The Rolling Stones in dressing room (how embarrassing was that for Johnny?). I love Moz and his music and believe he is just as much a songwriter as his band mates because his vocal melodies dictate the direction of the song and elevate it to genius level. However, he is self destructive and seems intent on destroying his own success before it happens. He is his own worst enemy and that is a pity because artistically he remains unrivalled.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I haven't seen much revisionism in Johnny's given reasons for leaving the Smiths. The crucial point seems that it is reasons plural - not one specific incident: starting to feel musically restricted by the band; Morrissey being very difficult to work with on a professional basis by blowing out video shoots/tours/refusing to pay people; no manager; everyone close to him getting hacked out of the picture by a jealous Morrissey; getting sucked into Morrissey's mind-games as the relationship between them broke down, with the planted story in the NME that he was leaving being the final straw that broke the camel's back. There doesn't have to be one, clear singular reason for leaving - just a whole bunch of stuff on one side that gradually tipped things over to a state where it was better to get the hell out than remain.

This is true and I believe all of his grievances he believes and were factors but when all of those reasons come out one after the other in separate interviews it can create an uncertain or doubtful impression in the reader. First it's this then it's this then it's this etc can make it seem like the stories always changing. Also I think it important to keep in mind that the older you get the more you reflect on things the more your feelings might reveal themselves to you and the better you can understand your past descisions
 

g23

Always crashing in the same car
I'm looking forward to reading Johnny's book. Morrissey's was a fun read to be sure, but you really couldn't trust much of it. How many layers of purple prose can an author apply before the truth gets obscured, anyway?
Besides, differing perspectives of the same events are always fun.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I'm looking forward to reading Johnny's book. Morrissey's was a fun read to be sure, but you really couldn't trust much of it. How many layers of purple prose can an author apply before the truth gets obscured, anyway?
Besides, differing perspectives of the same events are always fun.

He got an interesting portrayal in sumner a book so I'm curious to see what he says about that period. I just hope it's not super dry. On this day we started tracking version twelve of such and such etc
 
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Anonymous

Guest
You realize the narrative of the book is shaped by recollections from more than just Johnny and the people he's close to, right?

Tony Fletcher openly stated in an interview that almost everybody he talked to wanted to clear it up with Johnny before because Johnny still talks to most of these people. There you go ...
 

countthree

Well-Known Member
He said he assumes people who are going to read his book have "a certain kind of intelligence".
He seems a nice guy, but he didn't show too much intelligence when he left the band. And later he wasn't clever enough in taking care of his relationship with the man who worked with him to make a legend of the band which he profits from until now.
If there's some hidden facts that can explain his seemingly silly conduct, he should tell them in his book. If he will be going to repeat the inconsistencies he tells in the interviews, his intelligent readers will be very disappointed. Believe it or not, some people think.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
As for The Smiths break-up stuff? I'm sure his side of the story would be a little more true to life than Morrissey's

There isn't really Morrissey's side of the break up story just guess work from him and even in his book he didn't disclose ANYTHING about the Smiths in his, I believe intentional, bitch fest. As if to say "Let others exploit the Smiths story over and over again, but not me."
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Had to be asked numerous times before he would walk on stage.

You may refer to this:

... and then watching Mike Hinc have to physically accompany an exhausted Morrissey on to the stage to perform ('The amount of time it took to get Morrissey onstage was getting longer and longer,' said Grant Showbiz. 'There was this great game he'd play of wanting to be asked fifteen times, if it'd been fourteen the night before. Johnny was like "Let's Rock!" and Mozzer'd be "Well, somebody's gotta ask me another seven times.'")

Sometimes Grant Showbiz is getting a bit carried away. How is someone's exhaustion and possible desperation because of it "a great game"? Regarding Morrissey the Smiths story is full of assumtions and interpretations rather than knowledge or insight.
 

bhops

Last of the famous international screw ups.
I think it is the fair assumption that johnny's reasons were varied and multi layered. The problem of perception being that he seems to pick and choose when to reference them as his reason for leaving.

It will be interesting to see how he addresses a couple of things. I assume he'll flatly deny Morrissey's assertion that Joe Moss tried to chuck him from the band. I'd be interested to hear his version of the court case as he clearly agrees with Morrissey that they never agreed to 25% with Joyce and also see if he mentions approaching Morrissey at any point to reform the Smiths.

It should be an enjoyable read.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Hopefully he will spend more than a few pages on The Smiths and will resist the temptation to write an 80 page rant about the court case. One thing is for certain: it will be a more structured enlightening read than the stream of consciousness Moz autobiography.
I would be interested to read about Marr's experiences with Electronic and The The (and Kirsty McColl too).
Agree. The Autobio should have been called The Court Case.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I think it is the fair assumption that johnny's reasons were varied and multi layered. The problem of perception being that he seems to pick and choose when to reference them as his reason for leaving.

It will be interesting to see how he addresses a couple of things. I assume he'll flatly deny Morrissey's assertion that Joe Moss tried to chuck him from the band. I'd be interested to hear his version of the court case as he clearly agrees with Morrissey that they never agreed to 25% with Joyce and also see if he mentions approaching Morrissey at any point to reform the Smiths.

It should be an enjoyable read.

It would be interesting to see what he says about the reformation. I could be wrong but it thought I remembered him saying a few contradictory things about it
 

bhops

Last of the famous international screw ups.
It would be interesting to see what he says about the reformation. I could be wrong but it thought I remembered him saying a few contradictory things about it

He's actually vacillated (or oscillated, haha) around the subject of reformation for quite a few years.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
He's actually vacillated (or oscillated, haha) around the subject of reformation for quite a few years.

I just thought I remembered him saying its as possible at some point before twenty ten and the. He seemed to say it wasn't. I couldn't find much thought when I googled so I'm probably just remembering incorrectly
 
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