Message from Morrissey; "...Playboys" re-release in March - true-to-you.net

Via True-to-you:

Message from Morrissey

The reports of my death have been greatly understated. Once admitted to the William Beaumont Hospital at Royal Oak in Michigan, I received treatment for concussion, a bleeding ulcer, and Barrett's esophagus. The positive from all of this is that there are now no known ailments left for me to try.
I am fully determined to resume the tour on February 9 at the Chelsea Ballroom in Las Vegas. If there's an audience of any kind in attendance, I just might die with a smile on my face, after all. If I am not there, I shall probably never again be anywhere.
Equally, I am determined to play Flint (Michigan) if it kills me (which, on the face of it, it almost has.)

Thank you to everyone present at both Brooklyn (New York) and Melbourne (Australia) during recent weeks for two of the best nights of what might charitably be termed my "career". My debt to you will outlive time itself.

pause at my headstone,
MORRISSEY
31 January 2013.



Also:

Additional Morrissey news - true-to-you.net
31 January 2013

Additional Morrissey news.

In March, EMI (UK) will issue a re-mastered The Last Of The Famous International Playboys as a single, on both vinyl and CD formats. The original release reached UK #6 in 1989.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
A

Anonymous

Guest
I thought YOR was a really great album.I think Morrissey`s creativity is alive and well and doing damn fine.

In which case, you were, and are, wrong. He's a caricature of himself now; he has been since, at least, 2004.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
My preyer;
Dear St. Rita the saint of impossible causes. I prey that our Lord Jesus Christ touches the illness and heals any aliment, sickness or illness of Morrissey. I prey that he is healed and lives life abundantly! For he has brought to many of us joy, time and a spiritual happiness and a since of being!! Please St. Rita I prey to thee!! Amen!

Always, Nickie

"Theres a prayful online creche"
 

Tom Tom Club

Tom Tom Club
Have you been to a show lately? He's better than he's ever been.
Hi Crystal did you get my pm message to you.

I hope to God Morrissey is going to be alright. It seems so not right that Andy Rourke who was a heroin addict is doing well and is healthy. And men like Morrissey who have healthy lives have all the problems.
 

Tibby

Morrissey Lover
In which case, you were, and are, wrong. He's a caricature of himself now; he has been since, at least, 2004.


I beg to differ.I think you are wrong.Perhaps Morrissey is too challenging for you.Maybe Taylor Swift would be more to your liking.May I suggest One Direction or something like it/them? Anonymous?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I beg to differ.I think you are wrong.Perhaps Morrissey is too challenging for you.Maybe Taylor Swift would be more to your liking.May I suggest One Direction or something like it/them? Anonymous?

The only thing he's "challenging" is my patience.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Obviously, I was in no shape to see him for the "Kill Uncle" or "Your Arsenal" tours, but, having seen videos from said period, I'm not sure if I'd go that far.

Sorry, disagree. I went to quite a few shows on both of those yours, and every subsequent tour, and the 91/92 live Morrissey was nowhere near as good as he has been for the last 13 or 14 years. The shows back then were still amazing because the fans were mental, and Morrissey 'mania' was in full swing. As far as his voice or the band were concerned, there was much left to be desired. The band were all over the place, and admittedly inexperienced, live shows were usually even shorter, and his voice was often pretty weak live. All you have to do is watch/listen to Live In Dallas, BWD, or any other shoes from that era, and compare them to Who Put The M..., Live At Earls Court, etc. The difference is rather shocking really. The fans were a lot more rabid in those days though, and that helped to make the live experience during those first two tours pretty electric. But listen to songs like Suedehead, Playboys, EDILS, etc., live from period. They sound pretty awful.
 

Mozza220559

Surmontil 50
You're all acting like a bunch of reactionary paranoid wankers, yeah he's been a bill ill on this tour so what? You're all acting like he's got a terminal illness.

Get some perspective.
 

Anaesthesine

Angel of Distemper
For goodness sakes, does everything have to devolve into "Morrissey isn't what he used to be?" No, he's not. That explains so much of the bitterness here: he's 53, and everyone has to deal with it. He seems to be coping surprisingly well.

Morrissey's height was The Smiths: he was shiny and new, and in the best band on the planet. He and J. Marr were unstoppable and a tonic in the slick, regressive Reagan/Thatcher '80s. Those dizzying heights were scaled and eventually he had to come down.

His early solo period was surprising to many of us, because folks didn't think he'd be able to hack it on his own. It was something of a comedown from The Smiths, but the post-Smiths hysteria carried him along, he put together a decent band and eventually, improbably, he shot back up to a level of sustained crazy. His '90s shows were erotic psychodramas fueled by his dazzling looks and great moves.

Sorry, disagree. I went to quite a few shows on both of those yours, and every subsequent tour, and the 91/92 live Morrissey was nowhere near as good as he has been for the last 13 or 14 years. The shows back then were still amazing because the fans were mental, and Morrissey 'mania' was in full swing. As far as his voice or the band were concerned, there was much left to be desired. The band were all over the place, and admittedly inexperienced, live shows were usually even shorter, and his voice was often pretty weak live. All you have to do is watch/listen to Live In Dallas, BWD, or any other shoes from that era, and compare them to Who Put The M..., Live At Earls Court, etc. The difference is rather shocking really. The fans were a lot more rabid in those days though, and that helped to make the live experience during those first two tours pretty electric. But listen to songs like Suedehead, Playboys, EDILS, etc., live from period. They sound pretty awful.

Exactly. It's all about the vocals now; although he's still improbably glamorous, there just isn't the hysteria that there used to be. It's 2013, Morrissey is middle-aged and his audience skews older, too. However, his vocals are as strong (if not stronger) than they ever were, and there's a protective, loving, joyful vibe at the shows that is a celebration of such an unlikely career and (for people like me) such an unlikely, continuing affection. He's not thrashing around any more it's true, he has to actually sing, but when he belts out "November Spawned a Monster" or tears his way through "Maladjusted" he's magnificent.

Morrissey rocks his 50s better than anyone could have possibly expected, and his best shows these days are not just good, not just great, but truly remarkable. I know a few people who refuse to see him because they don't want to ruin the memory of what he once was, but they're wrong; he's the most strangely soulful singer on the planet and the older he gets the more obvious that becomes.

I'm no apologist: his lyrics aren't what they used to be, his attitude in interviews these days leaves much to be desired, and the music lacks its former subtlety and finesse, but live Morrissey is charming, engaging, funny and often deeply vulnerable: he's second to none.
 

Tibby

Morrissey Lover
The only thing he's "challenging" is my patience.

I don`t get it.Why do people like you keep coming here if you think so little of Morrissey?Why do you bother?Does it make you feel important to spread your negativity?I guess it`s true misery does love company.And you say all of this anonymously?I suppose you don`t like to stand behind your opinions.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
For goodness sakes, does everything have to devolve into "Morrissey isn't what he used to be?" No, he's not. That explains so much of the bitterness here: he's 53, and everyone has to deal with it. He seems to be coping surprisingly well.

Morrissey's height was The Smiths: he was shiny and new, and in the best band on the planet. He and J. Marr were unstoppable and a tonic in the slick, regressive Reagan/Thatcher '80s. Those dizzying heights were scaled and eventually he had to come down.

His early solo period was surprising to many of us, because folks didn't think he'd be able to hack it on his own. It was something of a comedown from The Smiths, but the post-Smiths hysteria carried him along, he put together a decent band and eventually, improbably, he shot back up to a level of sustained crazy. His '90s shows were erotic psychodramas fueled by his dazzling looks and great moves.



Exactly. It's all about the vocals now; although he's still improbably glamorous, there just isn't the hysteria that there used to be. It's 2013, Morrissey is middle-aged and his audience skews older, too. .

Morrissey rocks his 50s better than anyone could have possibly expected, and his best shows these days are not just good, not just great, but truly remarkable. I know a few people who refuse to see him because they don't want to ruin the memory of what he once was, but they're wrong; he's the most strangely soulful singer on the planet and the older he gets the more obvious that becomes.

I'm no apologist: his lyrics aren't what they used to be, his attitude in interviews these days leaves much to be desired, and the music lacks its former subtlety and finesse, but live Morrissey is charming, engaging, funny and often deeply vulnerable: he's second to none.

Eloquently stated, I could not agree more.

This: "However, his vocals are as strong (if not stronger) than they ever were, and there's a protective, loving, joyful vibe at the shows that is a celebration of such an unlikely career and (for people like me) such an unlikely, continuing affection. He's not thrashing around any more it's true, he has to actually sing, but when he belts out "November Spawned a Monster" or tears his way through "Maladjusted" he's magnificent"
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
The difference between the Melbourne and Sydney shows was like night and day. Perhaps he got them mixed up?
 
Christ! I step away from the net for a couple of days and someone tells me that Morrissey has terminal cancer (bloody rumour mill). I was so relieved to read his message that I burst into tears. The man means so much to me that a world without him, would be a world with the lights dimmed.

But, on a less hysterical note, I work in a radiology department and we see quite a few patients with Barrett's Oesophagus; although it can impact on lifestyle, it can be managed effectively, depending on severity. I'm hoping that in this case, it's quite mild and Moz won't have any of the more serious, associated complications.

Get well soon yer daft apeth!

Viva Morrissey!
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
For goodness sakes, does everything have to devolve into "Morrissey isn't what he used to be?" No, he's not. That explains so much of the bitterness here: he's 53, and everyone has to deal with it. He seems to be coping surprisingly well.

Morrissey's height was The Smiths: he was shiny and new, and in the best band on the planet. He and J. Marr were unstoppable and a tonic in the slick, regressive Reagan/Thatcher '80s. Those dizzying heights were scaled and eventually he had to come down.

His early solo period was surprising to many of us, because folks didn't think he'd be able to hack it on his own. It was something of a comedown from The Smiths, but the post-Smiths hysteria carried him along, he put together a decent band and eventually, improbably, he shot back up to a level of sustained crazy. His '90s shows were erotic psychodramas fueled by his dazzling looks and great moves.



Exactly. It's all about the vocals now; although he's still improbably glamorous, there just isn't the hysteria that there used to be. It's 2013, Morrissey is middle-aged and his audience skews older, too. However, his vocals are as strong (if not stronger) than they ever were, and there's a protective, loving, joyful vibe at the shows that is a celebration of such an unlikely career and (for people like me) such an unlikely, continuing affection. He's not thrashing around any more it's true, he has to actually sing, but when he belts out "November Spawned a Monster" or tears his way through "Maladjusted" he's magnificent.

Morrissey rocks his 50s better than anyone could have possibly expected, and his best shows these days are not just good, not just great, but truly remarkable. I know a few people who refuse to see him because they don't want to ruin the memory of what he once was, but they're wrong; he's the most strangely soulful singer on the planet and the older he gets the more obvious that becomes.

I'm no apologist: his lyrics aren't what they used to be, his attitude in interviews these days leaves much to be desired, and the music lacks its former subtlety and finesse, but live Morrissey is charming, engaging, funny and often deeply vulnerable: he's second to none.

BING-FREAKING-O! So right on as usual, Anaesthesine. I agree with every single syllable.
 

CrystalGeezer

My secret's my enzyme.
A

Anonymous

Guest
Hi Crystal did you get my pm message to you.

I hope to God Morrissey is going to be alright. It seems so not right that Andy Rourke who was a heroin addict is doing well and is healthy. And men like Morrissey who have healthy lives have all the problems.


If only you knew the truth !
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I have been fortunate to see five concerts on this tour, and I strongly agree that he is providing an amazing stage presence, greater than I have ever seen in the past; so, it is frustrating to see this interruption. However, it is impossible to control some situations in life, and I hope that his proclaimed fans will be compassionate. Like many of you, I have suffered the disappointment of cancelled shows and the financial crunch of forfeited hotel deposits; but, I have come to the conclusion that the man is a genious, and with great brilliance comes difficult temperment. This type of personality is also frequently plagued by physical illness due to stress and depression. While so many are quick to dispute the sincerity of Morrissey's health issues, I whole-heartedly believe that he truly cannot help his condition, whether the symptoms are a result of a physical ailment or just a case of extreme melancholy. I doubt that Morrissey sits in a hotel room and purposely plans to shit on his fans by cancelling concerts; as with most people who suffer from severe depression, he probably agonizes over every move he makes, knowing that he has disappointed some and instigated the hateful, hurtful wrath of others who claim to be fans. I have come to the conclusion that if your truly love Morrissey, if his words have helped to save your life, then you need to accept the bad with the good. As we all know, the body of work that Morrissey has given us far outshines that of any other lyricist. As many others have stated, the man seriously needs to take a break; he must be physically, mentally, and emotionally worn out from this insane schedule. I am a few years younger, and just attending three concerts in the same week nearly did me in. I hope that our beloved poet finds a quiet place to regroup after this tour ends, a place that allows him to be introspective and reflective so that he can return to writing the heart-wrenching poetry that initially pulled all of us into his aura.
 

realitybites

making lemonade
Subscriber
For goodness sakes, does everything have to devolve into "Morrissey isn't what he used to be?" No, he's not. That explains so much of the bitterness here: he's 53, and everyone has to deal with it. He seems to be coping surprisingly well.

Morrissey's height was The Smiths: he was shiny and new, and in the best band on the planet. He and J. Marr were unstoppable and a tonic in the slick, regressive Reagan/Thatcher '80s. Those dizzying heights were scaled and eventually he had to come down.

His early solo period was surprising to many of us, because folks didn't think he'd be able to hack it on his own. It was something of a comedown from The Smiths, but the post-Smiths hysteria carried him along, he put together a decent band and eventually, improbably, he shot back up to a level of sustained crazy. His '90s shows were erotic psychodramas fueled by his dazzling looks and great moves.



Exactly. It's all about the vocals now; although he's still improbably glamorous, there just isn't the hysteria that there used to be. It's 2013, Morrissey is middle-aged and his audience skews older, too. However, his vocals are as strong (if not stronger) than they ever were, and there's a protective, loving, joyful vibe at the shows that is a celebration of such an unlikely career and (for people like me) such an unlikely, continuing affection. He's not thrashing around any more it's true, he has to actually sing, but when he belts out "November Spawned a Monster" or tears his way through "Maladjusted" he's magnificent.

Morrissey rocks his 50s better than anyone could have possibly expected, and his best shows these days are not just good, not just great, but truly remarkable. I know a few people who refuse to see him because they don't want to ruin the memory of what he once was, but they're wrong; he's the most strangely soulful singer on the planet and the older he gets the more obvious that becomes.

I'm no apologist: his lyrics aren't what they used to be, his attitude in interviews these days leaves much to be desired, and the music lacks its former subtlety and finesse, but live Morrissey is charming, engaging, funny and often deeply vulnerable: he's second to none.

You always impress me with each careful, articulate, insightful, and BALANCED post.
 

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