The Horror thread

hand in glove

Life is never kind
1. The Entity


2. The Exorcist


3. The Omen


4. The Amityville Horror - 1979


6. The Exorcism of Emily Rose


7. Jaws
 

celibate

Forever Ill
well the one with Damien innit, horror is not my fave

I would like to see some more, maybe it will lift up my thoughts about horror

[haven't seen any of 'lord of the rings' movies, and Potter movies, so that gives you a clue how I'm updated on movies]

I saw jaws, it has it moments
 
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Johnny Barleycorn

Well-Known Member

About ten years ago I watched Jaws with an ex-girlfriend who claimed to have only heard of it, and as Brody climbed the mast and took aim at the air tank she said "Oh. I think I've seen this film."
 

Mozza220559

Surmontil 50
Don't know what movie this is from, but it seems interesting...
tumblr_luelfefF391qjeh4lo1_500.gif

I saw that a while ago! Get it? Saw?

Har har, I crack me up.

(I've no clue what it's from by the way but looks interesting)

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Don't know what movie this is from, but it seems interesting...
tumblr_luelfefF391qjeh4lo1_500.gif

I saw that a while ago! Get it? Saw?

Har har, I crack me up.

(I've no clue what it's from by the way but looks interesting)
 

Detritus

Teenage Lightning
It was difficult to narrow it down to five, and I'm sure after I post this I'll think of another five films I should have posted instead, but here it goes:


5. Carnival of Souls - I sometimes see this film written off as "schlock horror" and while the criticism is not entirely unwarranted, Carnival of Souls is nonetheless full of genuinely creepy moments and wrought with incredible atmosphere and a singular--even artful--visual style. It's a horror classic in my book.

4. Phantasm - Two words: Tall Man.

3. Audition - I know this one has already been mentioned, but I couldn't leave it off my list. I love Takashi Miike's work, especially when he ventures into horror, and Audition is one of his finest moments. To the unsuspecting viewer, the final sequence of this film is the movie-going equivalent of being repeatedly bludgeoned in the face with a sledgehammer.

2. In a Glass Cage - This Spanish film by Agustí Villaronga is so emotionally and mentally draining that I've only watched it once; I honestly don't know if I could manage another viewing. It's a psychologically harrowing and uncommonly realistic exploration of the cycles of child abuse, the corruptive effects of power, and the pitiless depths of human depravity. I watched it because I read an interview with John Waters in which he claimed it was more intense than Salo, and boy he wasn't kidding. When the credits started to roll I couldn't move, I just sat in my chair completely numb and stayed there, immobile, for a good 20 minutes. The only other movie that left me feeling so f***ed up after I watched it was The Vanishing, and that was mostly just from shock.

1. Hellraiser - I must admit that this at number one mostly for nostalgic reasons, as it completely captured my imagination when I was a small child and was probably the first horror movie I ever saw. I had absolutely no concept of the plot let alone the philosophical and psychosexual themes running throughout, but that didn't matter. I was wholly drawn in by Barker's now signature aesthetic: sort of BDSM meets Mary Shelley, alluring in its grotesqueness. I had never seen anything like it. I begged my mom to rent the VHS from Blockbuster and watched it repeatedly, obsessed. The Chatterer gave me nightmares I couldn't look away and didn't want to. No other movie has left as much of an impression on me as this one.

And, with the exception of the laughably bad practical effects, I think it's fair to say that Hellraiser has held up remarkably well. I revisit it every so often and each time I'm blown away by how refreshingly unique and atypical it is as a horror film, especially when considered in the context of its production and release at a time when slasher films had reached the zenith of their popularity.
 

!Viva Hate!

Well-Known Member
Don't Look Now

The Omen

Don't Look Now is very underrated...it's a bit silly that most people who know about it only know it for the sex scene.

Also, The Omen is a great film. Absolutely one of my favorites. It was also nice to see David Warner not play a jerk for once. Lol.

1. The Entity
2. The Exorcist
3. The Omen
4. The Amityville Horror - 1979
6. The Exorcism of Emily Rose
7. Jaws

All great movies with the exception of Emily Rose. :p

The Entity has always been one of my favorites...the whole demon freezing ending was a bit silly, though.

I like Amityville a lot. I think it could have been a little more effective than it was, especially Jodie, but what do you expect from a film with Margot Kidder? She almost ruined Black Christmas and the Superman series for me as well. But my God, the Amityville score is amazing.

It was difficult to narrow it down to five, and I'm sure after I post this I'll think of another five films I should have posted instead, but here it goes:

5. Carnival of Souls - I sometimes see this film written off as "schlock horror" and while the criticism is not entirely unwarranted, Carnival of Souls is nonetheless full of genuinely creepy moments and wrought with incredible atmosphere and a singular--even artful--visual style. It's a horror classic in my book.

4. Phantasm - Two words: Tall Man.

3. Audition - I know this one has already been mentioned, but I couldn't leave it off my list. I love Takashi Miike's work, especially when he ventures into horror, and Audition is one of his finest moments. To the unsuspecting viewer, the final sequence of this film is the movie-going equivalent of being repeatedly bludgeoned in the face with a sledgehammer.

2. In a Glass Cage - This Spanish film by Agustí Villaronga is so emotionally and mentally draining that I've only watched it once; I honestly don't know if I could manage another viewing. It's a psychologically harrowing and uncommonly realistic exploration of the cycles of child abuse, the corruptive effects of power, and the pitiless depths of human depravity. I watched it because I read an interview with John Waters in which he claimed it was more intense than Salo, and boy he wasn't kidding. When the credits started to roll I couldn't move, I just sat in my chair completely numb and stayed there, immobile, for a good 20 minutes. The only other movie that left me feeling so f***ed up after I watched it was The Vanishing, and that was mostly just from shock.

1. Hellraiser - I must admit that this at number one mostly for nostalgic reasons, as it completely captured my imagination when I was a small child and was probably the first horror movie I ever saw. I had absolutely no concept of the plot let alone the philosophical and psychosexual themes running throughout, but that didn't matter. I was wholly drawn in by Barker's now signature aesthetic: sort of BDSM meets Mary Shelley, alluring in its grotesqueness. I had never seen anything like it. I begged my mom to rent the VHS from Blockbuster and watched it repeatedly, obsessed. The Chatterer gave me nightmares I couldn't look away and didn't want to. No other movie has left as much of an impression on me as this one.

And, with the exception of the laughably bad practical effects, I think it's fair to say that Hellraiser has held up remarkably well. I revisit it every so often and each time I'm blown away by how refreshingly unique and atypical it is as a horror film, especially when considered in the context of its production and release at a time when slasher films had reached the zenith of their popularity.

I really love the first Phantasm...the sequels are a whole other beast in their own right. The whole idea of the film itself is so ridiculous when you try to explain it to people. A few weeks ago I tried to describe it to NHNS and as I was explaining it, I began to feel silly. Lol. I recall there being a disco remix of the Phantasm theme from the 70s by someone named Doctor Zorro. Lol. From what I understand, the fifth (and hopefully final as Angus Scrimm isn't going to live forever) film is completed and going to be released. I look forward to that even after how hollow OblIVion was.

Hellraiser is a film I like a lot...however, it is a film (and film series) where I feel the characters are so strong, but the story never seems to do them any justice. I feel the same about most horror films with an iconic character in them. We have a really nice blu-ray steelbook from Australia featuring the first three films.
 

Johnny Barleycorn

Well-Known Member
I'm going to nominate the hugely underrated Legion: Exorcist III.

George C. Scott takes on the role of Lt. Kinderman from the first movie, Lee J. Cobb being unavailable due to having died fourteen years before.

The Gemini Killer has returned, his perverted trademarks left on the remains of his victims, and Kinderman must find him. The problem is the Gemini has already been caught and executed years before, so who is the copycat killer, and how do they know the Gemini's true modus operandi when it was never made public?

There are some great shocks in this movie, and George C. Scott is majestic. This is a worthy successor to the original movie.
 

cornelius blaze

Boychild mustn't tremble!
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The Driller Killer.
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quatermass-and-the-pit.jpg


The Wicker Man:
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Madcap

Member
Last House on Dead End Street:


Black Sunday:


Fright Night:


The Legend of Hell House:


Humanoids From the Deep:


Favorite horror writer:

Richard Laymon.
 
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CrystalGeezer

My secret's my enzyme.
I'm just going to put this here since I think you're the only audience that'll appreciate it even though it's not technically "horror." A dead sperm whale washed ashole somewhere on the eastcoast this week. It started to bloat. This is what happens when you relieve the pressure of bloated sperm whale. I bet it smelled awesome. :D

"Honey, what did you do at work today?"

 
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Drew a swallow

deep and blue
One of the scariest images from a film when I was about 10. I was off of school and up late. This has always stayed with me
 
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Johnny Barleycorn

Well-Known Member
Anyone else bored of torture porn?

I think it's really sick. I was shown Hostel which I hated, but it was Wolf Creek which did it for me. I don't find it scary, but just the worst sort of exploitative tripe.
 
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