Which record label should release "Bonfire Of Teenagers"?

SuedeMoz

Well-Known Member
Self-funded, digital, small imprint etc are options, but that really doesn't fit with the last few decades worth of releases.
...
Considering some of the people involved with the album, I'm surprised nobody has found a solution, but (as with a lot of things) this may just be Morrissey being obstinate more than anything else!?
Regards,
FWD.

Perhaps I'm being totally naive here... but maybe there's a scenario where he puts BOT on streaming services like Spotify, and optionally makes the digital files available to buy/download for $5-$10. So now the music is out there being heard and we didn't lose years waiting - great, mission accomplished. Perhaps mid-2022 or so he tours. Maybe based on the streaming numbers, tickets sales, etc. it's enough to generate interest and a record deal is forthcoming for the material post BOT?

While all of the above seems possible, as @Famous when dead pointed out, based on past experience he'll wait it out for years if necessary until there's a deal. Totally his call... but it just seems like such a waste especially at this later phase of his career.
 
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A

Anonymous

Guest
I worry that (as others have mentioned on this thread and elsewhere), it could be the title track that's the obstacle here. Obviously he's written about controversial topics since the first Smiths album but given his comments about the Manchester bombing I can't see the lyrics to any song about it being anything except provocative and likely to cause (rightly or wrongly) all manner of bad press. And as the title track, it would be inescapable.

If he had an album of lyrics like "Once I Saw the River Clean" on the other hand, I could imagine a few labels taking a punt on that...

I agree with you. The title is completely insensitive to the victims of the Manchester bombing. Who in their right minds would release that?
 

SuedeMoz

Well-Known Member
I agree with you. The title is completely insensitive to the victims of the Manchester bombing. Who in their right minds would release that?
Yeah, kind of like when he thought rereleasing "Paris" after the attacks there was a good idea... was he at least offering to donate proceeds to a victim's fund or anything like that?
 

Jamie

Bluff, Ardour & Assoc.
Yeah, kind of like when he thought rereleasing "Paris" after the attacks there was a good idea... was he at least offering to donate proceeds to a victim's fund or anything like that?
I believe this tilt-at-the-windmills ended after the following:


In a nutshell, the order of events was:

1. Morrissey publicly claimed Universal refused to rerelease "Paris."
2. Universal denied refusing to rerelease it.
3. Morrissey refuted Universal's denial.
4. Morrissey/TTY posted both a letter to Universal (which, given the language/aggrieved tone, is almost certainly Morrissey's words with Boz's signature - see similar language in the leaked e-mail decrying his perception of Sanctuary's publicity efforts for "The Youngest Was The Most Loved"/RotT) as well as the apparent letter in response from Universal.

In the final reply from Universal, it was said: Universal would licence the song back for eg a release for proceeds to relevant charities (which I assume would be the plan). There seems to have been no response back from the Morrissey camp - at least none publicly. It would appear that Universal was angling in the direction of a charitable release. Based on the news archive, this seems to be the only time during the incident that such a purpose for the re-release was mentioned - unless it was done so in conversation outside the public record.

Tl; dr - if Morrissey ever offered to donate proceeds to Bataclan victims/families, it has never been confirmed publicly.
 
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SuedeMoz

Well-Known Member
I believe this tilt-at-the-windmills ended after the following:


In a nutshell, the order of events was:

1. Morrissey publicly claimed Universal refused to rerelease "Paris."
2. Universal denied refusing to rerelease it.
3. Morrissey refuted Universal's denial.
4. Morrissey/TTY posted both a letter to Universal (which, given the language/aggrieved tone, is almost certainly Morrissey's words with Boz's signature - see similar language in the leaked e-mail decrying his perception of Sanctuary's publicity efforts for "The Youngest Was The Most Loved"/RotT) as well as the apparent letter in response from Universal.

In the final reply from Universal, it was said: Universal would licence the song back for eg a release for proceeds to relevant charities (which I assume would be the plan). There seems to have been no response back from the Morrissey camp - at least none publicly. It would appear that Universal was angling in the direction of a charitable release. Based on the news archive, this seems to be the only time during the incident that such a purpose for the re-release was mentioned - unless it was done so in conversation outside the public record.

Tl; dr - if he offered to donate proceeds, it has never been confirmed publicly.
Thanks for clarifying... couldn't quite remember all the details...
 
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