Anthony Bourdain's "Parts Unknown" / Los Angeles features Morrissey fans and Chicano community

Segment at end of show on Morrissey/Smiths fans in Los Angeles includes interviews and clips of a MorrisseyOKE karaoke night in Boyle Heights.

Excerpt from Bourdain’s Field Notes / Los Angeles:

Around halfway through the shoot, somebody called me and asked if I knew about “the Morrissey thing.” They said, “Morrissey is HUGE with Chicanos! Check it out.”

This seemed, frankly, an incongruous if not an outright unbelievable assertion.

If true, what was it about Morrissey—an English son of Irish immigrants, famous for his songs about doomed love, bad sex, homoeroticism, vulnerability, and alienation—that resonated so powerfully with Mexican-Americans?

So I started asking everybody I spoke with as we filmed—from Ultimate Fighting stars Nate and Nick Diaz and Gilbert Melendez—to action hero Danny Trejo. (None of them had much idea who Morrissey was—or gave a ****). But just about everybody else smiled when I asked the question. Often a shy, knowing smile was followed by the kind of answer that makes an interviewer hold his breath, hoping the answer goes on and on.

In the end, I think, this question cracked the code. You’ll have to watch to see what the hell I’m talking about.



Link posted by an anonymous person (original post):



Rene writes:

During a segment with actor Danny Trejo, "Parts Unknown" host Anthony Bourdain brought up Morrissey's popularity in the Hispanic culture.

Bourdain: "Are you a Morrissey fan by any chance?"

Trejo: "Morrissey?"

Bourdain: "Like from his band The Smiths- it's like a British rock band of the late '80's- that is apparently hugely popular with the Chicano community. So, you have not been touched by this?"

Unfortunately, Trejo is no Moz fan, answering "I'm an oldies guy, you know what I mean?"

Not the answer we may have hoped for as fellow Morrissey fans, but still a nice mention on CNN tonight.

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Related items:
 
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It wasn't the total cringfest I was anticipating especially because of Bordains utter disdain of anything vegetarian or vegan. I feel however that the show wasn't so much about typical Los Angeles cuisine, it was more about how the predominant Mexican-American community in Los Angeles adapted to the needs of the people. One essential need being a taste of home as more and more gentrification happens to the areas surrounding DTLA. The best part for me was MMA fighters The Diaz bros talking about changing their diet while training to a vegan diet, I thought they would up their meat intake, wish Bordain would have asked them about Morrissey especially since that was the running gag throughout the show. The cringiest bit for me was the playing of Irish Blood, English heart to the backdrop of a smiling tacquero (taco stand) but the other than that It was a good show. :o
 

gordyboy9

its not me its you.
on a side note,,was looking at the wiki lyric section and theres a song called nightmare under N.does anyone know anything about this.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
thanks torrmoz for pointing out the spreading of misinformation and ignorance.

I haven't had a cold all winter, while all the meat eaters around me were covered head to toe in their own phlegm. So chew on that and choke Anthony Boredain ! you killer of life... hater of life. :angry: :straightface:

We'll Let You Know rated your post
clear.png
Troll in this thread :laughing:


WE'LL LET YOU TROLL :flowers:

Agree. Boredain is a kitchen-nazi. He does not have the right to be ignorant at such a high level if he talks about food and nutrition. He must inform himself about vegetarian an vegan diets, as well as other diets.

Another nazi attitude I find in mainstream TV series and films is the way they treat people with food allergies or food intolerances. When they depict characters that follow a restrictive diet (vegetarian, vegan, milk-free, gluten-free, etc.) they show them as problematic persons, nuisances, people you better not have social interaction with, crazy or fanatic. That is the nazi-food ideology of today's entertainment industry and I think it's entwined with commercial interests related to food industry, which wants to continue making us eat the same shit they are poisoning us with and being accomplices in animal serial killings. "Entertainment" industry guys are treating people who follow different diets in the same way they treated people with different sexual choices or darker skin tones some decades ago: like weirdos that deserve to be socially discriminated.
 

vegan.cro

Banned
..."Every vegetarian waiter I've worked with is brought down by any rumor of a cold."... A. Bourdain

Story of vegan ultra-athlete Rich Roll;
"One night, shortly before I turned 40, I became out of breath from a simple flight of stairs when I was going to bed. I had to pause, I was winded, there was tightening in my chest, sweat on my brow. I feared I was on the precipice of having a heart attack.

"Heart disease runs in my family. It's a terrifying ailment.

"That was when I knew. It was my second rock bottom. That thrust me into this new phase of trying to find a way to eat and live that would be alignment with my higher self and my healthiest self."

After trying a range of diets over the course of the next year, Roll finally came across a wholefood vegan diet.
"It changed everything. I had so much energy all of a sudden. I actually wanted to take care of myself. I wanted to exercise," Roll explained.

"About 10 to 14 days into eating a completely wholefood plant-based diet, I realised how different it was to everything else I tried. It revitalised me like no other way of eating. I wanted to feel this way all the time."

It was then that Roll became more educated about the benefits of a wholefood plant-based diet. He enlisted the help of an old swimming friend, who acted as a mentor to help make the transition so that he could do so responsibly and intelligently with the right tools.

As Roll became fitter, stronger and lost 22kg, becoming an ultra-athlete was almost a natural progression.

"I wasn't intent on becoming a competitive athlete in my 40s, but with every consecutive week that went by, I was getting fitter and stronger, and I became amazed at the resilience of the human body," Roll said.

"That got me interested in testing the outer limits of my own potential and, ultimately, that's what attracted me to the world of ultra endurance and the races I compete in."
Roll began to train for the Ultraman race, a three-day invite-only double Ironman distance triathlon which circumnavigates the Big Island of Hawaii. In 2008, with only six months of training, Rich achieved the second fastest swim time and finished 11th overall in the event.

"I've raced in the Ultraman a couple of times. In 2009, I had a 10-minute lead on the first day and suffered a terrible bike accident on the second day that took me out of contention and had me benched for an hour. Ultimately I did finish the race and came sixth place overall. I haven't won that race but it was my best performance."

Fast-forward to now. Roll is now 51, still a vegan and ultra endurance athlete, and a best-selling author.

"I've been doing it for 10 years now and I don't know if there's anything in my life that's the same, except that I'm married to the same woman," Roll said.

"I don't practise law anymore. My life is about health and wellness and all these things I would never have imagined.

"There's nothing that's not improved or impacted positively and significantly by living this life. My plant-based diet is what propelled me, what made me capable of doing what I did.

"My plant-based diet is not a hindrance, it's a secret weapon."
If you're wondering, at a training point of view, how a wholefood vegan diet is beneficial to an athlete, it's all about reducing inflammation.

"Plant-based foods are, in general, far less inflammation provoking. They're anti-inflammatory," Rolls said.

"As an athlete, you're always trying to improve and enhance your recovery. You get stronger and faster and more powerful in the time in between workouts, when your body is trying to repair the tissue damage from exercise-induced stress.

"Eating plant-based reduces inflammatory responses which allows the body to rehabilitate itself more quickly, meaning you can bounce back more quickly, which in terms means you can train harder and you're less likely to get overtired, over-train or injured.

"When you protract that over the course of a season or a year, you're going to see tremendous performance gains. I think eating plant-based is optimal for athletes."

And what about protein? Aren't vegans protein deficient?

"All I can say is I've been doing this for 10 years and I haven't had a problem building lean muscle mass."

And Roll isn't alone.

"There's vegan athletes competing at the highest level across all different disciplines -- in football, in basketball, MMA, hockey and soccer," Roll said.

"There's plenty of triathletes, runners and ultra runners. Scott Jurek, perhaps the most celebrated and decorated ultra runner of all time, is a long-time vegan."
Wondering what Rich Roll eats in a day? Us, too.

Breakfast
"In general, I get up anywhere between 5 and 6am. I usually do my training in the morning," Roll told HuffPost Australia.

"Sometimes I wake up, drink a bunch of water, maybe have a small cup of coffee, and I'm out the door to train. I won't eat anything."

If Roll plans to train super hard or is facing a very long training session, he'll have a large smoothie.

"Breakfast for me is usually a smoothie in the Vitaminx comprised of dark leafy greens (like kale, chard and spinach), beets and beet greens, berries, pineapples, superfoods (spirulina, chia seeds, hemp seeds, ground flax seeds), coconut water, citrus, banana -- I have four kids so often it's just whatever we happen to have in the fridge.

"If I'm super hungry, I'll have almond butter on gluten-free toast, or cold quinoa with berries and coconut milk."
Training snacks
"During the workout, if it's a long bike ride, my go-to fuelling sources are bananas, sweet potatoes and dates. For running, almond butter or coconut water, but usually I don't bring anything."

Post-training fuel
"Post-workout is usually another smoothie. It's similar to the one I mentioned with the exception of a scoop of protein powder, sometimes. But I don't always do that -- maybe once or twice a week."

Lunch
"Lunch is usually a big salad. I try to keep things light. Eating fruit, nuts and salad throughout the day is my typical thing," Roll said.

"I don't sit down for a big lunch meal. I graze lightly throughout the day."

Dinner
"My big meal is dinner. My wife is an amazing cook. We have anything from vegan enchiladas and burritos to burgers. We do eat a lot of Mexican food."

Supplements
"Protein powder or supplements are not a big part of my routine. I'm not worried about not meeting my nutritional needs," Roll said. "I take a B12 supplement, which is the only supplement I take."
Case Closed.
rich2.jpg
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
..."Every vegetarian waiter I've worked with is brought down by any rumor of a cold."... A. Bourdain

Story of vegan ultra-athlete Rich Roll;
"One night, shortly before I turned 40, I became out of breath from a simple flight of stairs when I was going to bed. I had to pause, I was winded, there was tightening in my chest, sweat on my brow. I feared I was on the precipice of having a heart attack.

"Heart disease runs in my family. It's a terrifying ailment.

"That was when I knew. It was my second rock bottom. That thrust me into this new phase of trying to find a way to eat and live that would be alignment with my higher self and my healthiest self."

After trying a range of diets over the course of the next year, Roll finally came across a wholefood vegan diet.
"It changed everything. I had so much energy all of a sudden. I actually wanted to take care of myself. I wanted to exercise," Roll explained.

"About 10 to 14 days into eating a completely wholefood plant-based diet, I realised how different it was to everything else I tried. It revitalised me like no other way of eating. I wanted to feel this way all the time."

It was then that Roll became more educated about the benefits of a wholefood plant-based diet. He enlisted the help of an old swimming friend, who acted as a mentor to help make the transition so that he could do so responsibly and intelligently with the right tools.

As Roll became fitter, stronger and lost 22kg, becoming an ultra-athlete was almost a natural progression.

"I wasn't intent on becoming a competitive athlete in my 40s, but with every consecutive week that went by, I was getting fitter and stronger, and I became amazed at the resilience of the human body," Roll said.

"That got me interested in testing the outer limits of my own potential and, ultimately, that's what attracted me to the world of ultra endurance and the races I compete in."
Roll began to train for the Ultraman race, a three-day invite-only double Ironman distance triathlon which circumnavigates the Big Island of Hawaii. In 2008, with only six months of training, Rich achieved the second fastest swim time and finished 11th overall in the event.

"I've raced in the Ultraman a couple of times. In 2009, I had a 10-minute lead on the first day and suffered a terrible bike accident on the second day that took me out of contention and had me benched for an hour. Ultimately I did finish the race and came sixth place overall. I haven't won that race but it was my best performance."

Fast-forward to now. Roll is now 51, still a vegan and ultra endurance athlete, and a best-selling author.

"I've been doing it for 10 years now and I don't know if there's anything in my life that's the same, except that I'm married to the same woman," Roll said.

"I don't practise law anymore. My life is about health and wellness and all these things I would never have imagined.

"There's nothing that's not improved or impacted positively and significantly by living this life. My plant-based diet is what propelled me, what made me capable of doing what I did.

"My plant-based diet is not a hindrance, it's a secret weapon."
If you're wondering, at a training point of view, how a wholefood vegan diet is beneficial to an athlete, it's all about reducing inflammation.

"Plant-based foods are, in general, far less inflammation provoking. They're anti-inflammatory," Rolls said.

"As an athlete, you're always trying to improve and enhance your recovery. You get stronger and faster and more powerful in the time in between workouts, when your body is trying to repair the tissue damage from exercise-induced stress.

"Eating plant-based reduces inflammatory responses which allows the body to rehabilitate itself more quickly, meaning you can bounce back more quickly, which in terms means you can train harder and you're less likely to get overtired, over-train or injured.

"When you protract that over the course of a season or a year, you're going to see tremendous performance gains. I think eating plant-based is optimal for athletes."

And what about protein? Aren't vegans protein deficient?

"All I can say is I've been doing this for 10 years and I haven't had a problem building lean muscle mass."

And Roll isn't alone.

"There's vegan athletes competing at the highest level across all different disciplines -- in football, in basketball, MMA, hockey and soccer," Roll said.

"There's plenty of triathletes, runners and ultra runners. Scott Jurek, perhaps the most celebrated and decorated ultra runner of all time, is a long-time vegan."
Wondering what Rich Roll eats in a day? Us, too.

Breakfast
"In general, I get up anywhere between 5 and 6am. I usually do my training in the morning," Roll told HuffPost Australia.

"Sometimes I wake up, drink a bunch of water, maybe have a small cup of coffee, and I'm out the door to train. I won't eat anything."

If Roll plans to train super hard or is facing a very long training session, he'll have a large smoothie.

"Breakfast for me is usually a smoothie in the Vitaminx comprised of dark leafy greens (like kale, chard and spinach), beets and beet greens, berries, pineapples, superfoods (spirulina, chia seeds, hemp seeds, ground flax seeds), coconut water, citrus, banana -- I have four kids so often it's just whatever we happen to have in the fridge.

"If I'm super hungry, I'll have almond butter on gluten-free toast, or cold quinoa with berries and coconut milk."
Training snacks
"During the workout, if it's a long bike ride, my go-to fuelling sources are bananas, sweet potatoes and dates. For running, almond butter or coconut water, but usually I don't bring anything."

Post-training fuel
"Post-workout is usually another smoothie. It's similar to the one I mentioned with the exception of a scoop of protein powder, sometimes. But I don't always do that -- maybe once or twice a week."

Lunch
"Lunch is usually a big salad. I try to keep things light. Eating fruit, nuts and salad throughout the day is my typical thing," Roll said.

"I don't sit down for a big lunch meal. I graze lightly throughout the day."

Dinner
"My big meal is dinner. My wife is an amazing cook. We have anything from vegan enchiladas and burritos to burgers. We do eat a lot of Mexican food."

Supplements
"Protein powder or supplements are not a big part of my routine. I'm not worried about not meeting my nutritional needs," Roll said. "I take a B12 supplement, which is the only supplement I take."
Case Closed.
View attachment 41474

THE QUALITY OF MERCY IS NOT STRAINED FRUIT

I feel sorry for all these innocent plants that have to be slaughtered to feed selfish sap-thirsty vegans like this guy. Killers of Plant Life must be stopped!

PLANTS DESPERATELY WANT TO LIVE AND YOU JUST SLICE AND DICE THEM INTO OBLIVION!

Have you no mercy, sense of guilt, a conscience???
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Bourdain doesn't have to do shit. He's spot on in what he does. He's overcome more hardship than the lot of you whiny twits. Keep your dietary preferences to yourselves. Nobody cares about your twig-ass regimen and you're well out of line trying tell others how to live their lives. Just a suggestion... Try eating a bacon sandwich. It'll raise your cognitive ability, make you happier and more tolerable to the rest of the thinking individuals on the planet.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
yes. What would you call it? To take the life of another animal for what ever reason is called 'killing'.

do humans not have brains intelligent enough to build society, to use science to better themselves and most importantly to live outside the cycle of predator/hunter and be preyed upon by other animals by having to survive in the wilds? If you still live in a hut or cave in the jungle, then I say, yes of course, go do what one must do to survive, but I don't feel that's the case. Then one must take in all the intelligent reasons for becoming vegan in order not to destroy this planet, which eating animals plays a large role in doing.

On the subject of pets...

'The question of vegan dogs and cats is one that is frequently framed in the form of the objection, But you feed your dogs and cats meat; that’s not vegan! Elsewhere it arises among vegans themselves who, by definition, seek to eliminate the use of animal products wherever possible, but who find themselves confronted with a difficult dilemma when it comes to what to feed the companion animals in their care.

Let’s start with dogs. Dogs are not obligate carnivores, and in fact much of the scientific literature classifies them as omnivores. Regardless, dogs can and do easily thrive on a properly formulated vegan diet, and this can be accomplished by feeding them a ready-made vegan dog food, of which several brands exist, or preparing a whole foods vegetable diet for them that includes things like rice, sweet potatoes or carrots, lentils, and other veggies many dogs love, along with any needed supplements. You can find abundant testimonies and successful recipes from guardians of longtime healthy vegan dogs online. In fact, one of the longest-lived recorded dogs in history (25 years), Bramble, was vegan and her story is quite famous. She is the first of many vegan dogs profiled here.

As for felines: there is more legitimate concern around the subject of raising cats on a vegan diet because cats are considered true carnivores. However, this does not mean they cannot obtain all the nutrients they need from synthetically supplemented vegan cat food. The most commonly circulated objection to vegan cats has been disproven, which is the argument that cats cannot obtain the crucial nutrient taurine from a vegan diet. Vegan cat foods are formulated with synthetic taurine. But so, it turns out, are nearly all meat-based cat foods.

While cats have no problem deriving taurine from freshly killed animals in nature, the kibble and canned food we buy for them in stores is made from slaughterhouse by-products, or those bits of slaughtered animals deemed unfit for human consumption and “rendered” in a denaturing process that strips them of any remaining taurine (and many other nutrients). As a result, most dog and cat food producers add synthetic taurine (and other nutrients) to their products, and this same supplement is added to vegan cat foods. The greater risk for cats is that some cats fed even the most nutritionally balanced vegan cat food end up developing serious urinary tract problems (mainly the development of crystals and blockages in their bladders) that can be painful and even fatal. You can read more about this here.

However, many cats are documented as having lived to a ripe old age, and in flourishing good health, on a properly formulated and supplemented vegan diet. At one page devoted to vegan dogs and cats, the authors write: “The nutritional needs of dogs and cats are easily met with a balanced vegan diet and certain supplements. James Peden, author of Vegetarian Cats & Dogs, developed Vegepet™ supplements to add to vegetarian and vegan recipes. They are nutritionally balanced and also come in special formulas for kittens, puppies, and lactating cats and dogs.” (Read stories of individual cats living well on meat-free diets, here).'

from... http://freefromharm.org/common-justifications-for-eating-animals/vegan-dogs-and-cats/

So how are you going to get animals in the wild to follow this vegan diet as they can't read and don't have any money to get FedEx to deliver them Vegan food packages?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Agree. Boredain is a kitchen-nazi. He does not have the right to be ignorant at such a high level if he talks about food and nutrition. He must inform himself about vegetarian an vegan diets, as well as other diets.

Another nazi attitude I find in mainstream TV series and films is the way they treat people with food allergies or food intolerances. When they depict characters that follow a restrictive diet (vegetarian, vegan, milk-free, gluten-free, etc.) they show them as problematic persons, nuisances, people you better not have social interaction with, crazy or fanatic. That is the nazi-food ideology of today's entertainment industry and I think it's entwined with commercial interests related to food industry, which wants to continue making us eat the same shit they are poisoning us with and being accomplices in animal serial killings. "Entertainment" industry guys are treating people who follow different diets in the same way they treated people with different sexual choices or darker skin tones some decades ago: like weirdos that deserve to be socially discriminated.

You sound like a weirdo who deserves to be socially discriminated against.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
You sound like a weirdo who deserves to be socially discriminated against.

Pray you never have to keep a special diet for medical reasons, because then you will find how stupid and ignorant most people are. Just like you.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
You've failed Tony. All these years and you're only now beginning to ask people if they like Morrissey. Don't you really think that you should've been asking people if they like Morrissey and Wild Turkeys all along?
Him and Nigella were made in meat heaven. You and me Turks were never meant to be.
 

Landon

New Member
I feel like this topic has been discussed so much that it's not even worth discussing anymore. Who cares about Mexicans and their interest in Morrissey? Most of them cling onto his short lived rockabilly phase and could care less about his new material. Believe me I know, I live in Southern California and know many of these people. Maaaybe 2 out of 10 have his latest album, and that's being generous. They're more intersted in the image and nostalgia. Now haters will love to argue that but it's the truth
 

Ketamine Sun

<><><><><><><><><><>
So how are you going to get animals in the wild to follow this vegan diet as they can't read and don't have any money to get FedEx to deliver them Vegan food packages?


Well, first of all... who said anything about WILD animals?

In my post that you are replying to I said... 'On the subject of pets...'

please read the post through before you react.
 

Ketamine Sun

<><><><><><><><><><>
Bourdain doesn't have to do shit. He's spot on in what he does. He's overcome more hardship than the lot of you whiny twits. Keep your dietary preferences to yourselves. Nobody cares about your twig-ass regimen and you're well out of line trying tell others how to live their lives. Just a suggestion... Try eating a bacon sandwich. It'll raise your cognitive ability, make you happier and more tolerable to the rest of the thinking individuals on the planet.

'Keep your dietary preferences to yourselves.' Well tell A.B to.

'Nobody cares about your twig-ass regimen and you're well out of line trying tell others how to live their lives.' tell that to A.B.

'Try eating a bacon sandwich. It'll raise your cognitive ability, make you happier and more tolerable to the rest of the thinking individuals on the planet.'

Please keep your dietary preferences to yourself. And nobody cares about your fat-ass regimen and you're well out of line trying tell others how to live their lives.

:tiphat:
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
'Keep your dietary preferences to yourselves.' Well tell A.B to.

'Nobody cares about your twig-ass regimen and you're well out of line trying tell others how to live their lives.' tell that to A.B.

'Try eating a bacon sandwich. It'll raise your cognitive ability, make you happier and more tolerable to the rest of the thinking individuals on the planet.'

Please keep your dietary preferences to yourself. And nobody cares about your fat-ass regimen and you're well out of line trying tell others how to live their lives.

:tiphat:

All us of here at the Meaty, Beaty, Big and Bouncy Appreciation Society care.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
..."Every vegetarian waiter I've worked with is brought down by any rumor of a cold."... A. Bourdain

Story of vegan ultra-athlete Rich Roll;
"One night, shortly before I turned 40, I became out of breath from a simple flight of stairs when I was going to bed. I had to pause, I was winded, there was tightening in my chest, sweat on my brow. I feared I was on the precipice of having a heart attack.

"Heart disease runs in my family. It's a terrifying ailment.

"That was when I knew. It was my second rock bottom. That thrust me into this new phase of trying to find a way to eat and live that would be alignment with my higher self and my healthiest self."

After trying a range of diets over the course of the next year, Roll finally came across a wholefood vegan diet.
"It changed everything. I had so much energy all of a sudden. I actually wanted to take care of myself. I wanted to exercise," Roll explained.

"About 10 to 14 days into eating a completely wholefood plant-based diet, I realised how different it was to everything else I tried. It revitalised me like no other way of eating. I wanted to feel this way all the time."

It was then that Roll became more educated about the benefits of a wholefood plant-based diet. He enlisted the help of an old swimming friend, who acted as a mentor to help make the transition so that he could do so responsibly and intelligently with the right tools.

As Roll became fitter, stronger and lost 22kg, becoming an ultra-athlete was almost a natural progression.

"I wasn't intent on becoming a competitive athlete in my 40s, but with every consecutive week that went by, I was getting fitter and stronger, and I became amazed at the resilience of the human body," Roll said.

"That got me interested in testing the outer limits of my own potential and, ultimately, that's what attracted me to the world of ultra endurance and the races I compete in."
Roll began to train for the Ultraman race, a three-day invite-only double Ironman distance triathlon which circumnavigates the Big Island of Hawaii. In 2008, with only six months of training, Rich achieved the second fastest swim time and finished 11th overall in the event.

"I've raced in the Ultraman a couple of times. In 2009, I had a 10-minute lead on the first day and suffered a terrible bike accident on the second day that took me out of contention and had me benched for an hour. Ultimately I did finish the race and came sixth place overall. I haven't won that race but it was my best performance."

Fast-forward to now. Roll is now 51, still a vegan and ultra endurance athlete, and a best-selling author.

"I've been doing it for 10 years now and I don't know if there's anything in my life that's the same, except that I'm married to the same woman," Roll said.

"I don't practise law anymore. My life is about health and wellness and all these things I would never have imagined.

"There's nothing that's not improved or impacted positively and significantly by living this life. My plant-based diet is what propelled me, what made me capable of doing what I did.

"My plant-based diet is not a hindrance, it's a secret weapon."
If you're wondering, at a training point of view, how a wholefood vegan diet is beneficial to an athlete, it's all about reducing inflammation.

"Plant-based foods are, in general, far less inflammation provoking. They're anti-inflammatory," Rolls said.

"As an athlete, you're always trying to improve and enhance your recovery. You get stronger and faster and more powerful in the time in between workouts, when your body is trying to repair the tissue damage from exercise-induced stress.

"Eating plant-based reduces inflammatory responses which allows the body to rehabilitate itself more quickly, meaning you can bounce back more quickly, which in terms means you can train harder and you're less likely to get overtired, over-train or injured.

"When you protract that over the course of a season or a year, you're going to see tremendous performance gains. I think eating plant-based is optimal for athletes."

And what about protein? Aren't vegans protein deficient?

"All I can say is I've been doing this for 10 years and I haven't had a problem building lean muscle mass."

And Roll isn't alone.

"There's vegan athletes competing at the highest level across all different disciplines -- in football, in basketball, MMA, hockey and soccer," Roll said.

"There's plenty of triathletes, runners and ultra runners. Scott Jurek, perhaps the most celebrated and decorated ultra runner of all time, is a long-time vegan."
Wondering what Rich Roll eats in a day? Us, too.

Breakfast
"In general, I get up anywhere between 5 and 6am. I usually do my training in the morning," Roll told HuffPost Australia.

"Sometimes I wake up, drink a bunch of water, maybe have a small cup of coffee, and I'm out the door to train. I won't eat anything."

If Roll plans to train super hard or is facing a very long training session, he'll have a large smoothie.

"Breakfast for me is usually a smoothie in the Vitaminx comprised of dark leafy greens (like kale, chard and spinach), beets and beet greens, berries, pineapples, superfoods (spirulina, chia seeds, hemp seeds, ground flax seeds), coconut water, citrus, banana -- I have four kids so often it's just whatever we happen to have in the fridge.

"If I'm super hungry, I'll have almond butter on gluten-free toast, or cold quinoa with berries and coconut milk."
Training snacks
"During the workout, if it's a long bike ride, my go-to fuelling sources are bananas, sweet potatoes and dates. For running, almond butter or coconut water, but usually I don't bring anything."

Post-training fuel
"Post-workout is usually another smoothie. It's similar to the one I mentioned with the exception of a scoop of protein powder, sometimes. But I don't always do that -- maybe once or twice a week."

Lunch
"Lunch is usually a big salad. I try to keep things light. Eating fruit, nuts and salad throughout the day is my typical thing," Roll said.

"I don't sit down for a big lunch meal. I graze lightly throughout the day."

Dinner
"My big meal is dinner. My wife is an amazing cook. We have anything from vegan enchiladas and burritos to burgers. We do eat a lot of Mexican food."

Supplements
"Protein powder or supplements are not a big part of my routine. I'm not worried about not meeting my nutritional needs," Roll said. "I take a B12 supplement, which is the only supplement I take."
Case Closed.
View attachment 41474

Yuk! Phlegm drinks for lunch.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I feel like this topic has been discussed so much that it's not even worth discussing anymore. Who cares about Mexicans and their interest in Morrissey? Most of them cling onto his short lived rockabilly phase and could care less about his new material. Believe me I know, I live in Southern California and know many of these people. Maaaybe 2 out of 10 have his latest album, and that's being generous. They're more intersted in the image and nostalgia. Now haters will love to argue that but it's the truth

WELL I WONDER

How many Mexicans did you interrogate and ask whether they had Morrissey's latest album?

Do you walk up to Mexicans and ask them straight out 'Do you have Morrissey's latest album?' or do you start off with a general question about the weather or share your favorite recipe for vegan enchiladas to make them feel at ease?

You state you know 'many' of these Mexican Morrissey fans. What is your definition of 'many'? Three? Three thousand?

If you feel that the topic has been discussed so much that it's not even worth discussing anymore than why did you discuss it?

OH WELL I'LL NEVER LEARN
 

Landon

New Member
WELL I WONDER

How many Mexicans did you interrogate and ask whether they had Morrissey's latest album?

Do you walk up to Mexicans and ask them straight out 'Do you have Morrissey's latest album?' or do you start off with a general question about the weather or share your favorite recipe for vegan enchiladas to make them feel at ease?

You state you know 'many' of these Mexican Morrissey fans. What is your definition of 'many'? Three? Three thousand?

If you feel that the topic has been discussed so much that it's not even worth discussing anymore than why did you discuss it?

OH WELL I'LL NEVER LEARN
Goddamn you're annoying..
 

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