Morphine

Zelda Zonk

New Member
I'm looking to ask people of their experience of this drug. Was it given to someone you know before they passed away, and if so, what happened?
Any doctors here?
Sorry if this is a depressing thread.
This is in the name of research. :)
 

Uncleskinny

It's all good
Subscriber
I'm looking to ask people of their experience of this drug. Was it given to someone you know before they passed away, and if so, what happened?
Any doctors here?
Sorry if this is a depressing thread.
This is in the name of research. :)

When I had the first leg operation, in the night after the procedure, I was in a lot of pain. The nurse came along and jammed a syringe into my bottom, and gave me a chunk of Morphine. Did the job nicely. No pain, and slept like a...person that sleeps a lot (which of course is where Morphine got its name). Tramadol and Dihydrocodeine were also used at that time, but none were as effective as Morphine.

Peter
 

Helen Bach

New Member
I'm not a doctor, not full time anyway, but I would be prepared to accept any donations of Morphine for experimental purposes.
I would then come back to you with my full report.

All in the cause of research you understand.
 

Skinner

RIP The Rev
I thought you were going to ask about the band and I got excited. Oh well. If you like sax, check out Morphine the band. That is all.
 

Ni Nay

~~~~~
I know people who've had it after surgery, not before they passed away...
When they woke up, they could only stare, and hardly speak. For days.
Pretty scary.
 

Kilt Uncle

Active Member
Mrs. NRitH's grandmother was given morphine just an hour or two before she passed away from cancer a week ago.

Sorry to hear that man..:(

My auntie, who was like a second mother to me had morphine when she was treated for ovarian cancer.
 

DONNA

New Member
right guys, what i know about morphine is that there is two main types, morphine that is widely used as a general pain relief, and diamorphine which has 10x the strength of normal morphine, dia morphine is usually used after major surgery and in the terminally ill cancer sufferers mainly,
This slows down the natural bodies defence system to resist and fight enabling the patient to become coma like.
If you need to know anything else pm me and i will try to help you if i can
 
My friend gets a (temporary) morphine drip in her arm ever 10-12 months to treat cystic fibrosis; I'm not sure what it does, I should ask.
 

Uncleskinny

It's all good
Subscriber
right guys, what i know about morphine is that there is two main types, morphine that is widely used as a general pain relief, and diamorphine which has 10x the strength of normal morphine, dia morphine is usually used after major surgery and in the terminally ill cancer sufferers mainly,
This slows down the natural bodies defence system to resist and fight enabling the patient to become coma like.
If you need to know anything else pm me and i will try to help you if i can

Okey dokey. Diamorphine is DiAcetylMorphine, otherwise known as Heroin.

I salute you for your offer of help, but you need to get your chemistry/medicine right.

Peter
 

Zelda Zonk

New Member
The reason I ask is: is it used to speed up the passing-away process?
Someone I know died last week of cancer. She was definitely not good for a week beforehand and was going down hill, but a relative refused to give morphine on a specific date during that week.
When the morphine was administered, the person died within 24 hours. Also after being given the drug, she was not talking like her usual self. At the time this was put down to severe illness, senility, and confusion.
The doctor also explained the morphine would help with her difficulty in breathing, but upon reading the instructions it says it should not be used in the case of respiratory problems.

In a way I'm hoping someone can shed some light or give reassurance.

This is the 2nd instance I have known this to happen.
 
The reason I ask is: is it used to speed up the passing-away process?
Someone I know died last week of cancer. She was definitely not good for a week beforehand and was going down hill, but a relative refused to give morphine on a specific date during that week.
When the morphine was administered, the person died within 24 hours.
Also after being given the drug, she was not talking like her usual self. At the time this was put down to severe illness, senility, and confusion.
The doctor also explained the morphine would help with her difficulty in breathing, but upon reading the instructions it says it should not be used in the case of respiratory problems.

In a way I'm hoping someone can shed some light or give reassurance.

This is the 2nd instance I have known this to happen.

This is EXACTLY what happened to Mrs. NRitH's grandmother. She gave herself the dose, though, so it's possible that she knew exactly what it would do to her. :(
 

Corrissey

lovable loser
My father-in-law was administered morphine during his final days with cancer. We were all up in arms when my mother-in-law just gave it to him once because she could (according to the doc/Rx) and he literally was not there for hours when usually he was semi-coherent. It was hard to tell if he was in much pain -I don't think so- normally, he'd be given a dose about a half hour before flipping him in bed, when there was actual pain. It was a blessing he didn't linger longer than a week when he suddenly went downhill and was bedridden.

Sorry about your loss, Zelda.
 

Zelda Zonk

New Member
This is EXACTLY what happened to Mrs. NRitH's grandmother. She gave herself the dose, though, so it's possible that she knew exactly what it would do to her. :(

Sorry to hear of your loss.

I don't wish to pry into others affairs, but do you think she did know?
It is used to speed things up then?
It is something I am having trouble accepting. It would seem the drug was given in place of letting the person pass away quietly of natural means.
I hope I do not sound crass. Perhaps the subject is too sensitive, sorry.
 

oye terence

ampersand after ampersand
while i was in the hospital after my surgery i had a lovely little button that i could press and it would gimme morphine straight into my veins, it was a wonderful little button.
 

Zelda Zonk

New Member
My father-in-law was administered morphine during his final days with cancer. We were all up in arms when my mother-in-law just gave it to him once because she could (according to the doc/Rx) and he literally was not there for hours when usually he was semi-coherent. It was hard to tell if he was in much pain -I don't think so- normally, he'd be given a dose about a half hour before flipping him in bed, when there was actual pain. It was a blessing he didn't linger longer than a week when he suddenly went downhill and was bedridden.

Sorry about your loss, Zelda.

Yes, the relative was told that the morphine would ease her pain. But when we asked if she was in pain, she said no. Although clearly she did not have long to live, we were hoping she would hang on a little longer. So the question I'm asking is, did the morphine kill her (even though she would have passed away anyway).
 
Sorry to hear of your loss.

I don't wish to pry into others affairs, but do you think she did know?
It is used to speed things up then?
It is something I am having trouble accepting. It would seem the drug was given in place of letting the person pass away quietly of natural means.
I hope I do not sound crass. Perhaps the subject is too sensitive, sorry.

Mrs. NRitH's mom is pretty sure that grandma knew what she was doing. Grandma was holding out as least until Thanksgiving (this upcoming Thursday) so that she could see her entire extended family, but when we visited her two (three?), she definitely felt like she was seeing us for the last time. She even gave Mrs. NRitH the recipe that she herself has always made for Thanksgiving, and that was a huge, huge concession on her part.

She never claimed to be in much pain, even though she had cancer throughout her body, and it had even deteriorated a few of her vertebrae, which the doctors said should hurt immensely. But she was always a very proud person, and would never have admitted to feeling anything other than great. In those final couple weeks, though, it was clear that she couldn't hide it, and so that's why nobody would be surprised to find out that she took the morphine deliberately to hasten things.

I'm sorry you feel that the person you know wasn't allowed to die a natural death. To be fair, though, if the person passed away within 24 hours of the morphine, s/he probably didn't have a whole lot longer than that to live without the morphine, anyway. :(
 

Corrissey

lovable loser
Why didn't the person caring for her administer the morphine on that given day? That's a shame. Is it possible that fact alone (withholding it) could have had something to do with speeding up her death? I don't know. You don't think the caregiver gave her too much, do you? Is it possible she had a kind of allergic reaction to it? Hard to believe that morphine would actually kill someone, but I suppose anything is possible.

Also, I think when you're given morphine, you are by no means your usual self, I'm surprised the docs chalked it up to senility and whatnot. Lastly, you raise an interesting point, that -according to the Rx- morphine shouldn't be given to those with respiratory problems, my father-in-law was dying of lung cancer (and possibly brain cancer that returned), but again he wasn't give morphine but a handful of times in his final days. I'm afraid I'm not much help, sorry Zelda, but I hope you/they get some answers and find some peace and closure with her passing.
 
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