Possible names for Morrissey's next album

Mozza220559

Surmontil 50
Yeah but with the title Viva Hate it was a singular moment in his history, not just another album. Although the subsequent records were stronger, I think it was necessary for the debut's title to carry that kind of immediate message. Similarly with Maladjusted...there's a self-deprecation to it; obviously he is referring to himself but in a way where he is kind of admitting his vulnerability, and there's an all-inclusiveness to that title. Anyone feeling that way could get behind it.

That later stuff though...it's the Morrissey show. Whatever was left of him after the court case got eaten up by seven years of Los Angeles and the blind adoration of culturally displaced Mexicans. It went to his head.





Hey...no real names, f***o. :p

Just because my personal information, and distortions thereof, has been blasted all over these boards by various impotent dickweeds doesn't mean you can just randomly strip me of my rights.

And besides, while you were lumping me in with Georgie Girl, I was giving you a legitimate response to your thread.

Sorry, just heard that was your name, didn't mean to start anything, also who's Georgie Girl?
 
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Skylarker

Guest
I do believe his adoring hispanic fans add a unique edge to the bloke, considering on the surface he's always been very calm and inward, I understand he does like to dabble and sing about violence and crime but I think that's just a tantalising facet in his lyrics, not to offend you because you live in The States but he lost it when he moved to the US, what the f*** did he do in 7 years? He seemed to really get it together though in 2006 when he moved to Rome, everything was very well though out, the album title, the cover art for the album and singles, the branding, the production and also the label suited him. It's such a shame that the follow up falls short musically.

Today's music industry is so SO shallow now they won't touch anyone over 32, it's going to be interesting how Moz will tackle it and what angle he'll take to get out the album he wants.

The music industry has always been shallow. Morrissey has never had anything to do with the music industry as an industry. But he used to be able to make records that could be seen by certain people with the power to sign checks as commercially viable. Now, he really can't. The songs are simply not very good. He likes to bring up how well he can sell tickets...but concerts aren't albums. The mainstream, major label record industry isn't going to give a recording contract to a weird dinosaur who sells out shows on nostalgia.

95 percent of his sets involves very very old songs. Great songs, but old ones....despite his "albums' worth" of new material he claims to have in the can, yet will not play live even though he not only has claimed to have given up on getting a major label contract, and even though he claims to be fine with "only existing on Youtube."

Saying he lost it when he moved to the US does not offend me. I agree with you. Only an idiot would contest that claim. An iconic, intrinsically British, genuinely eccentric character allowed himself to form a rift with the culture he came from and loved because he lost a court case. And in those seven years, yes, something very very bad happened to him and he did not help it by totally Americanizing his band within what, a year after the comeback? OK, Boz is still there, but he barely counts.

And yes, "unique" is one word you could use for the Morrissey/Latino subculture...but I would not say it adds any edge to his art or legacy; as they worship him blindly and and it's not like in the old days when all of his fans worsipped him blindly. Nowadays, as a concise singular pocket of reliability, they are pretty much the go-to fanbase for that kind of devotion, so he caters to it, because he misses the days when he got that in spades from everyone...and deserved it.
 

realitybites

making lemonade
Subscriber
I do believe his adoring hispanic fans add a unique edge to the bloke, considering on the surface he's always been very calm and inward, I understand he does like to dabble and sing about violence and crime but I think that's just a tantalising facet in his lyrics, not to offend you because you live in The States but he lost it when he moved to the US, what the f*** did he do in 7 years? He seemed to really get it together though in 2006 when he moved to Rome, everything was very well though out, the album title, the cover art for the album and singles, the branding, the production and also the label suited him. It's such a shame that the follow up falls short musically.

What??? He was inspired... and wrote the songs that would comprise his best solo album ever, imo, You Are The Quarry. That is what happened when he moved to the US. :p And btw, his Mexican fans are the inspiration for one of his best solo songs, First of the Gang to Die.

 
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Skylarker

Guest
What??? He was inspired... and wrote the songs that would comprise his best solo album ever, imo, You Are The Quarry. That is what happened when he moved to the US. :p And btw, his Mexican fans are the inspiration for one of his best solo songs, First of the Gang to Die.


If you really look at the lyrics to that song, there is really nothing intrinsically Mexican in its inspiration. The song already existed in different form for Alain's other band. The new lyrics Morrissey put on it, other than vaguely mentioning "Hector," could be applied pretty much to any street gang...and if you really look at the lyrics, it's pretty much just random make-it-up-as-you-go stuff, not really about street gangs or violence at all and it's not really about Mexicans or anybody named Hector. It's not even remotely a "story" or any kind of modern-day ode or anything, like an old-time outlaw ballad or something. People act like it's Stagolee. It's ridiculous.

Good vocal melody, but that credit is mainly due to Whyte's original backing music.
 
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realitybites

making lemonade
Subscriber
If you really look at the lyrics to that song, there is really nothing intrinsically Mexican in its inspiration. The song already existed in different form for Alain's other band. The new lyrics Morrissey put on it, other than vaguely mentioning "Hector," could be applied pretty much to any street gang...and if you really look at the lyrics, it's pretty much just random make-it-up-as-you-go stuff, not really about street gangs or violence at all and it's not really about Mexicans or anybody named Hector. It's not even remotely a "story" or any kind of modern-day ode or anything, like an old-time outlaw ballad or something. People act like it's Stagolee. It's ridiculous.

Good vocal melody, but that credit is mainly due to Whyte's original backing music.

It was my understanding that the Mexican American fans embraced it as if it were a tribute to them. Let them have that. They are a loyal fan base. And Hector is a common name in that population. Don't have any other insight other than that. But I like the song. And I am glad Moz made a brilliant album that paid tribute to America--the good and bad. His music became accessible to many more fans. And many of these fans then embraced his older, quintessentially English stuff. He crossed the divide and brought two cultures together. Great job, imo.
 

Mozza220559

Surmontil 50
The music industry has always been shallow. Morrissey has never had anything to do with the music industry as an industry. But he used to be able to make records that could be seen by certain people with the power to sign checks as commercially viable. Now, he really can't. The songs are simply not very good. He likes to bring up how well he can sell tickets...but concerts aren't albums. The mainstream, major label record industry isn't going to give a recording contract to a weird dinosaur who sells out shows on nostalgia.

95 percent of his sets involves very very old songs. Great songs, but old ones....despite his "albums' worth" of new material he claims to have in the can, yet will not play live even though he not only has claimed to have given up on getting a major label contract, and even though he claims to be fine with "only existing on Youtube."

Saying he lost it when he moved to the US does not offend me. I agree with you. Only an idiot would contest that claim. An iconic, intrinsically British, genuinely eccentric character allowed himself to form a rift with the culture he came from and loved because he lost a court case. And in those seven years, yes, something very very bad happened to him and he did not help it by totally Americanizing his band within what, a year after the comeback? OK, Boz is still there, but he barely counts.

And yes, "unique" is one word you could use for the Morrissey/Latino subculture...but I would not say it adds any edge to his art or legacy; as they worship him blindly and and it's not like in the old days when all of his fans worsipped him blindly. Nowadays, as a concise singular pocket of reliability, they are pretty much the go-to fanbase for that kind of devotion, so he caters to it, because he misses the days when he got that in spades from everyone...and deserved it.

Everything you've put I agree, I don't want to squawk about how he's gone downhill but his current musical output is fair at best, for a start I'm wondering what the hell his managment are doing? Are they all just sat on their arses in the office waiting for EMI or Parlophone to ring? Or is Morrissey purposefully digging his heels in waiting for a deal to land on in lap? Either way things will get harder for him if he doesn't re-think his current structure, the thing is he still has the magic and clout when he plays live, he's still got it I think the mystery and appeal is still there, It just needs commiting to a f***ing good record, I'm not wasting anymore money on re-issues, what's the point? Actually I don't want the bloke I adore turning into some f***ing washed-up fat Elvis just before he died, I don't want that.

Also, I don't know if the band need scrapping or just need challenging, Moz (as they are his band) should be booting them up the arse and telling Jesse to tighten his playing where and when it's needed, I'll bet he never does this though, it's like he doesn't want to upset the balance incase another band member walks out. Just a thought...
 
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Skylarker

Guest
It was my understanding that the Mexican American fans embraced it as if it were a tribute to them. Let them have that. They are a loyal fan base. And Hector is a common name in that population. Don't have any other insight other than that. But I like the song. And I am glad Moz made a brilliant album that paid tribute to America--the good and bad. His music became accessible to many more fans. And many of these fans then embraced his older, quintessentially English stuff. He crossed the divide and brought two cultures together. Great job, imo.

I'm not saying that you are wrong that they embraced it; I'm saying that if one actually reads the words; there is very little to nothing intrinsically "Mexican" about it.

As for your comment about Quarry being a tribute to America, well...I'm not sure what songs you're referring to. America Is Not the World is about as pointedly shitty as you can get; even with the "I love you" thing (which he promptly changed in concert, by the way, to "I once loved you.")

Of course, he had no problem taking sanctuary here while he was running from a court order...

Irish Blood, English Heart...totally irrelevant to America, even when he changed it for American audiences from Labor and Tories to Democrats and Republicans...yet still mentioned Oliver Cromwell, which was, um...interesting.

I Have Forgiven Jesus, I'm Not Sorry, The World Is Full Of Crashing Bores, How Can Anybody Possibly Know How I Feel, I Like You, You Know I Couldn't Last..these are all songs that are totally non-location-specific.

All The Lazy Dykes...name-drops The Palms, but that's really the extent of anything specifically American. It's really just a crap song about him voicing his retarded belief that every housewife is secretly a lesbian, because since he doesn't understand the traditional construct of marriage and family then of course it must all be a sham that nobody could possibly get anything out of because, deep down, sexual orientation is a lightswitch you can flip on and off at will.

So when I play that album..on those rare occasions...I hear a collection of songs that are Morrissey paying tribute to himself, not to America.
 

CrystalGeezer

My secret's my enzyme.
Sh'diamond Memories
 

Mozza220559

Surmontil 50
I'm not saying that you are wrong that they embraced it; I'm saying that if one actually reads the words; there is very little to nothing intrinsically "Mexican" about it.

As for your comment about Quarry being a tribute to America, well...I'm not sure what songs you're referring to. America Is Not the World is about as pointedly shitty as you can get; even with the "I love you" thing (which he promptly changed in concert, by the way, to "I once loved you.")

Of course, he had no problem taking sanctuary here while he was running from a court order...


Irish Blood, English Heart...totally irrelevant to America, even when he changed it for American audiences from Labor and Tories to Democrats and Republicans...yet still mentioned Oliver Cromwell, which was, um...interesting.

I Have Forgiven Jesus, I'm Not Sorry, The World Is Full Of Crashing Bores, How Can Anybody Possibly Know How I Feel, I Like You, You Know I Couldn't Last..these are all songs that are totally non-location-specific.

All The Lazy Dykes...name-drops The Palms, but that's really the extent of anything specifically American. It's really just a crap song about him voicing his retarded belief that every housewife is secretly a lesbian, because since he doesn't understand the traditional construct of marriage and family then of course it must all be a sham that nobody could possibly get anything out of because, deep down, sexual orientation is a lightswitch you can flip on and off at will.

So when I play that album..on those rare occasions...I hear a collection of songs that are Morrissey paying tribute to himself, not to America.

Also let's not forget one of the most uniquley British songs he's done - Come Back To Camden
 

realitybites

making lemonade
Subscriber
I'm not saying that you are wrong that they embraced it; I'm saying that if one actually reads the words; there is very little to nothing intrinsically "Mexican" about it.

As for your comment about Quarry being a tribute to America, well...I'm not sure what songs you're referring to. America Is Not the World is about as pointedly shitty as you can get; even with the "I love you" thing (which he promptly changed in concert, by the way, to "I once loved you.")

Of course, he had no problem taking sanctuary here while he was running from a court order...

Irish Blood, English Heart...totally irrelevant to America, even when he changed it for American audiences from Labor and Tories to Democrats and Republicans...yet still mentioned Oliver Cromwell, which was, um...interesting.

I Have Forgiven Jesus, I'm Not Sorry, The World Is Full Of Crashing Bores, How Can Anybody Possibly Know How I Feel, I Like You, You Know I Couldn't Last..these are all songs that are totally non-location-specific.

All The Lazy Dykes...name-drops The Palms, but that's really the extent of anything specifically American. It's really just a crap song about him voicing his retarded belief that every housewife is secretly a lesbian, because since he doesn't understand the traditional construct of marriage and family then of course it must all be a sham that nobody could possibly get anything out of because, deep down, sexual orientation is a lightswitch you can flip on and off at will.

So when I play that album..on those rare occasions...I hear a collection of songs that are Morrissey paying tribute to himself, not to America.

There are only two songs on there that reference his native land. I said it is a tribute to America. I'm sticking with it. And I love, love, love this album. Nothing you say will make me change my mind. I loved it before I met you. And will love it when you're long gone. :lbf:
 
S

Skylarker

Guest
Also let's not forget one of the most uniquley British songs he's done - Come Back To Camden

I knew I was forgetting one! And you're right, it's the most intrinsically British track on there.


There are only two songs on there that reference his native land. I said it is a tribute to America. I'm sticking with it.

Well I mean, that's the point, though. It's not really centric to any specific location. If you wanna believe it's a tribute to America, fine...but you should at least be able to cite a coherent thread running through it with which to support that interpretation.

And I love, love, love this album. Nothing you say will make me change my mind. I loved it before I met you. And will love it when you're long gone. :lbf:

I'm not trying to make you change your mind. I think it's a solid album with some great songs. My argument with you revolved around your claim that it is a tribute to America.
 

realitybites

making lemonade
Subscriber
Well I mean, that's the point. It's not really centric to any specific location. If you wanna believe it's a tribute to America, fine...but you should at least be able to cite a coherent thread running through it with which to support that interpretation.


My statement was a rebuttal to Mozza's claim that he hasn't done squat since moving to the US and that it was a bad thing. I argued that it was a good thing--that it inspired him to create You Are the Quarry. I didn't say the songs were about America. I said they were inspired by and a tribute to our country and her fans. :)
 

CrystalGeezer

My secret's my enzyme.
He heard
 
S

Skylarker

Guest
If you wanna believe it's a tribute to America, fine...but you should at least be able to cite a coherent thread running through it with which to support that interpretation.

My argument with you revolved around your claim that it is a tribute to America.

I didn't say the songs were about America. I said they were inspired by and a tribute to our country and her fans. :)

If you wanna believe it's a tribute to America, fine...but you should at least be able to cite a coherent thread running through it with which to support that interpretation.

My argument with you revolved around your claim that it is a tribute to America.

I didn't say the songs were about America. I said they were inspired by and a tribute to our country and her fans. :)

If you wanna believe it's a tribute to America, fine...but you should at least be able to cite a coherent thread running through it with which to support that interpretation.

My argument with you revolved around your claim that it is a tribute to America.

pinwheel.gif
 

Emotional Guide Dog

Chairman Of The Bored
I'd call it, 'Retirement Of The Heart' or when his autobiography sells next to nothing - 'f***ed By Penguin'

Though whatever he calls it, it needs to have sticker saying, 'WARNING This disc contains the same songs each time you listen to it, even if you take it with you to many towns.'
Because apparently, some people just don't get that.
 

mcrickson

Reckless Endangerment
I can see Morrissey taking a page from Crass's book and naming an album "Penis Envy." I'm not sure why, to me it just seems like something he'd do.
 

realitybites

making lemonade
Subscriber
I can see Morrissey taking a page from Crass's book and naming an album "Penis Envy." I'm not sure why, to me it just seems like something he'd do.

Speaking of penis envy... not in a Freudian, psychoanalytic sense, but in a literal sense.. this documentary is so sad, and just heartbreaking to watch. I can't believe the guy had the balls to make this film even though he was clearly lacking in other areas. Documentary
 

MORRIZSEY

Wrong species
Speaking of penis envy... not in a Freudian, psychoanalytic sense, but in a literal sense.. this documentary is so sad, and just heartbreaking to watch. I can't believe the guy had the balls to make this film even though he was clearly lacking in other areas. Documentary
I saw that documentary a couple of years ago.
It is good when you see a man making a film about body issues, as it is 99% geared to women in todays TV.
Women seem to get systematic sympathy and support, where men get ridicule if they raise their heads at all on these themes.
 

realitybites

making lemonade
Subscriber
I saw that documentary a couple of years ago.
It is good when you see a man making a film about body issues, as it is 99% geared to women in todays TV.
Women seem to get systematic sympathy and support, where men get ridicule if they raise their heads at all on these themes.

So true. Kudos to him for being so brave and honest--especially about something so salient to his identity as a man. As more men come out and talk about such things, hopefully they will be met with a greater degree of empathy and acceptance. But you are right, there is much greater sympathy and support for women. People think men don't have societal pressures to look good and be perfect like women do. But they do. And yet, they are ridiculed for talking about it. Sad. I'm all for discussing problems as long as it leads to change or acceptance. What I can't stand is the broken record whining. As my Mama used to say, pee or get off the pot.
 
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